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THE PILGRIM 



Volume XV Plymouth, Mass., June, 1936 Number 1 

Published This Year as a Senior Year Book 



1935 THE PILGRIM STAFF 1936 

Editor-in-Chief ALBA MARTINELLI 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief JEAN WHITING 

Literary Editor DOROTHY PERKINS 

Assistant Literary Editor AUDREY DUTTON 

Business Manager ALAN HEY 

Assistant Business Manager FRANCIS SCHEID 

Boys' Athletics ALTON WHITING 

Girls' Athletics JANET CLARK 

Art PRISCILLA McCOSH 

Exchange Editor WARREN BRADFORD 

Assistant Exchange Editor LOIS BREWSTER 

French Editor ARLENE RAYMOND 

Latin Editor ELIZABETH BELCHER 

Alumni Editor ELIZABETH RYAN 

Joke Editor GEORGE CAMPBELL 

School News Editor MARY BODELL 

Feature Editor LUCY MAYO 

Assistant Feature Editor RALPH LAMBORGHINI 



Table of Contents 



COMMENCEMENT page 

History of t$e Class of 1936 4 

Last Will and Testament 5 

Parting Shots, 6 

Class Prophecy 19 

Overheard: Choice Remarks . . 21 

Thoughts on the Advent of Commencement 22 

Motion Picture Review 23 

Class Song 24 

Try These on Your Piano 25 

What is Your Choice? 25 

Class Poem .- 26 

LITERATURE 

For the Love of a Lady 27 

Bargain (?) Matinee 28 

I Dreamed a Dream 28 

The Fates Will Attend 29 

The Little People 3 3 

Musical Mysteries 3 3 

Winter 33 

Sophomore Poetry Page ,. 34 

Money Is As Money Does 35 

The Black Plague 35 

Nothing Ventured — Nothing Gained 37 

Coney Island 37 

Flood 38 

Spring in England 39 

Freshman Fancies 40 

The Irony of Fate 41 

The Modern Girl 41 

Hill Fever 41 

An Impending Battle 41 

The Good Old Days 43 

Mary 43 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 44 

We Couldn't Collect a Price — 44 

Sand Dune Grass 47 

Contentment . . 47 

ATHLETICS 48 

Confessions of a G-Man 52 

The Alumni Scrapbook 54 

A Tribute 54 

Principal's Column 55 

In Memoriam 5 5 

UNDER THE WHITE CUPOLA 57 

The Old Man .....'. 58 

One Withered Rose 58 

EXCHANGES 59 

Ambitions 60 



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THE PILGRIM 



Class of 1936 
of 

Plymouth High School 

OFFICERS 

President ANTHONY TAVERNELLI 

Vice-President MARIO GARUTI 

Secretary THELMA FERIOLI 

Treasurer RALPH LAMBORGHINI 

CLASS COLORS 

Turquoise Blue and Silver 

CLASS MOTTO 

Fortiter, Fideliter, Feliciter 

CLASS FLOWER 

Talisman Rose 



History of the Class of 1936 



IT seems strange to say that "we" — 
the Class of '36 — are history. To 
sigh and say, "Tempus fugit" is admit- 
tedly trite and yet, how better can the 
thought be expressed? Graduation 
draws near, and suddenly all the trival- 
ities of these last four years become im- 
portant. 

Before we review the highlights of 
these four years, let us first list a few 
facts for the enlightenment of the gen- 
eral public, that it may not judge us too 
harshly. 

1. We are semi-depression babes, 
having for four years nervously tried 
— with the rest of the country — to 
round the corner to prosperity. 

2. Since our Junior High School 
days we have hoped that "next year" 
[0 Temporal Mores!] we would be 
pursuing the paths of learning in a new 
school. Having just missed this glori- 
ous experience by one year, we can 
hardly be blamed if our faith in man- 
kind is more than shaken. 

-3, We have passed through four 
years filled with New Deals, knitted 
suits, musical extravaganzas, and floods 
— therefore we feel that we should be 
treated with compassion. 

4. We are a disillusioned, crest- 
fallen group that failed in its secret 
ambition to discover a fourth dimen- 
sion. 



Now, having placed our cards upon the 
ancestral table, let us proceed with the 
history, 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Shades of Lionel Barrymore, what 
have we here? Proudly we list a few 
of the dramatic successes presented by 
our class in assembly: "Sardines," 
"Elmer." 

Moreover, our class spirit manifested 
itself when the Freshman teams played 
the upperclassmen. We even developed 
a class cheer! 

We also distinguished ourselves in a 
ticket-selling contest for the operetta, 
the "Pirates of Penzance." 

Timidly we planned our first class 
dance — the never-to-be-forgotten Fresh- 
man Dance held on March 17, 1933 — 
and surprised even ourselves with its 
success. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
So joyous were we to leave behind us 
the ignominy of freshman days that 
we quite outdid ourselves in our en- 
deavors. Mrs. Swift's Creative Writ- 
ing Club lived up to its name and went 
even further in sponsoring the first 
Sophomore Hop. Its success prompted 
the club to celebrate with a trip to 
Braves Field in Boston to see a game 
with Brooklyn. 



THE PILGRIM 



Lady Luck smiled on the celebrants 
and made the game a sixteen-inning 
one. If you wish to be deluged with 
superlatives, ask anyone who went to 
the game whether or not he enjoyed it! 

In this momentous year the S. A. S. 
began to function actively. 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Tra la la la! for we are juniors! — 
so rang our joyous song as we ap- 
proached a step closer to that lofty pin- 
nacle, the senior year. 

"Pinafore," an operetta by Gilbert 
and Sullivan, was produced with many 
juniors in the cast. No doubt our 
teachers recall the event — we troubled 
them, we fear, by humming and whist- 
ling the tunes from the operetta for 
weeks and weeks. 

When hard work becomes pleasure, 
that's news — at any rate it did to 
our committee preparing for the Junior 
Prom ! Pseans of praise could be lav- 
ished on the affair, but let it suffice to 
say in good old American slang: "It 
was swell!" 



SENIOR YEAR 

The patient were rewarded. We 
meant to make our Senior year the best 
of all, and we like to think we have 
succeeded. 

Our Senior Dance, held on December 
13, was well attended, and our senior 
get-togethers in preparation for the 
dance were lots of fun. 

The S. A. S. held the first School 
Circus, and the results were so gratify- 
ing that we feel distinct pleasure when 
we say that many seniors helped to 
make it such a success that it will in 
all probability become an annual school 
event. 

Now, having passed through the 
calamity of being a freshmen, the vis- 
sisitudes of a sophomore, having sur- 
vived the joys of a junior and striven to 
attain dignity as a senior, we, the class 
of 1936, thoughtfully and a little sadly 
write "The End" to our high school days 
at P. H. S. Vale! 

Alba Martinelli '36 



Last Will and Testament 



WE, the class of 1936, having by vari- 
ous means and methods successfully 
passed four years' trial in the court of 
P. H. S. do, in all fairness to the facul- 
ty and underclassmen, bequeath the 
following: 

To Mr. Shipman : Our admiration for 
his equanimity in dealing with us and 
our major and minor difficulties. 

To Mrs. Raymond: A tall silk hat 
from which to pull more surprises for 
the classes to come. (Of course, these 
will be unpredictable, but they will be of 
the same general nature as her famous 
psychological tests, memory tests, and 
home lessons.) 

To Mr. Smiley: To aid in his vag- 
aries, field glasses for looking off into 
space. (We regret that they are not 
so powerful as the new 200-inch tele- 
scope at the Wilson observatory, but we 
hope that they will serve their purpose.) 

To Miss McNerny : Our sincere hope 
that the spacious "cuisine" in the new 
High School will not be in such a posi- 
tion as to catch all fragrant odors from 
the chemistry laboratory. (Biscuits 
saturated with H 2 S are most unpalata- 
ble.) 

To Mr. Ingraham : A little bottle of 
glue with which to stick down the little 
plume of hair on the back of his head. 
Of course, a pair of scissors would be as 



appropriate, but would not carry the 
sentiment. 

To Mr. Mongan : Aware of his habit 
of tossing chalk at unsuspecting pupils 
in his math classes, we present a box of 
rubber crayons. (We'll accept thanks 
at any time, Freshmen.) 

To Miss Brown : A cushion-top desk 
to be used solely as a chair. We could 
throw in a footstool but it might hit 
someone "en route." 

To Miss Locklin: A "grandpa" 
grand piano in the new school so that 
the remarkable quality of her playing 
will be the more appreciated. 

To Mr. Bagnall : A luxurious ori- 
ental rug in his new home room to si- 
lence those who persist in wearing 
leather heels. However, in case that 
does not serve its purpose, we add a box 
of powdered wax to make slippery the 
floor. Then he may chuckle gleefully at 
a pupil's humiliation. 

To Miss Judd: Sole charge over the 
new candy counter, if any, to be in- 
stalled in the new P. H. S. We under- 
stand that she has a very "sweet tooth." 

To Miss Kelly: Diamond-topped desks 
in her new home room to resist the ef- 
forts of any and all initial carvers. 

To Miss Humphrey: An English 
class containing no one who considers 
himself an outstanding comedian. 
Continued on Page 24 



THE PILGRIM 



PARTING 



DOUGLASS ARMSTRONG 

We seldom see him talking: 
He seems to us most shy, 
But faster beat some girlish 

hearts 
Whene'er he passes by. 



EVELYN ARRUDA 

Neat as wax, 
Our grandmas opined: 
It must have been Evelyn 
They had in mind. 



VINCENT BAIETTI 

"Vinnie's" in his counting 

house, 
Counting all our dimes: 
Cheerful and efficient 
In good or parlous times. 



GERALDINE BALBONI 

A ready smile and sparkling 
eyes 

For all who ever greet her; 

No person sane, we still main- 
tain, 

Discards the chance to meet 
her. 



ALICE BANZI 

She's one of the first in this 

year book 
And first in "Friendship's 

Book," too, 
She's never too tired or busy 
To stop and chat with you. 



ALEXANDER BARBIERI 

Ask him to help you, 
He'll gladly say, "Yes"; 
His talents are numerous 
We may well confess. 




SHOTS 



CHARLES BARENGO 

That's not a twinkle in his 

eye, 
It's just a look of doubt: 
As if you didn't watch your 

step, 
He'd surely find you out. 



MARION BEAUREGARD 

In our class of '36, 
We feel that we've been lucky 
To have a girl so full of fun 
As this one we call "Ducky." 



WILLIAM BAGNELL 

Bill may seem a quiet lad, 

He isn't one at all: 

He nearly wakes the dead each 

time 
He stamps into study hall. 



ELIZABETH BELCHER 

Here is a girl 
Who is always busy: 
But does she get cross 
When we call her Lizzie ! ! 



DEANE BEYTES 

Our Deane's not "Dizzy" - 

far from it, 
He is a "man of affairs" — 
He's ready and eager 
Though payment be meagre, 
To solve our class problems 
And shoulder our cares. 



BETTY BOUDROT 

In fair or stormy weather, 
It matters not a bit, 
Betty's hair is curly — 
How we envy it! 



THE PILGRIM 



WARREN BRADFORD 

We know why he is happy 
('Cause she's coming back in 

June,) 
But just what is the reason 

why 
They call him "The Goon"? 



EDWARD BREWSTER 

He plays the game of football 
Till we fear his nose won't 

heal — 
But in the classroom Eddie's 
Supporting a New Deal. 



NATALIE CALDERA 

Last winter every Saturday 

night 
She appeared as a Pilgrim 

Maid: 
In basketball at the Cordage 
Her long arms were displayed. 



CONSTANCE CALDERA 

She may be little, but O My! 
Who wouldn't take the chance 
To "trip the light fantastic" 
With Connie at a dance? 



JESSIE CALLAHAN 

"Kelly" loves the movies, 
She goes whene'er she's able — 
The handsome actors thrill 

her, 
Especially Clark Gable. 



GEORGE CAMPBELL 

The F'Amos and D'Andy Cir- 
cus 

Held all of us spellbound; 

Especially the end of the ele- 
phant, 

(That was Campbell dancing 
around.) 




MARJORIE CECCARELLI 

Your coal-black hair 
In graceful swirls 
Is quite the envy 
Of all the girls. 



PHILIP CHANDLER 

"Tarzan" has to walk now, 
He used to have a "crate." 
And in the evening you may 

see 
"Tarzan and His Mate." 



PRENTISS CHILDS 

Imaginary diaries 

We've heard he likes to write, 

He's stricter with himself than 

most 
If he never skips a night. 



KATHERINE CHRISTIE 

Katherine takes her own time 
To form a word or two; 
But she's an expert penman 
Compared to me — or you. 



JANET CLARK 

The best sport 
On Lincoln Street 
Hits the top 
On our score sheet. 



SARAH CLARK 

Flying feet 
Not a care, 

"Blimp" and "Mundy" 
Dancing there. 



THE PILGRIM 



WARD CLARK 

A cheery lad 
With flaming hair; 
You can't mistake him 
Anywhere. 



GEORGE COURTNEY 

Who's this guy Cupid 
We've been hearing about? 
We have a suspicion 
You must have found out. 



ANTONIO CARVALHO 

Tony likes his History (?) 

And he's very fond of cook- 
ing (?) 

But he surely does some queer 
things 

When teachers are not look- 
ing. 



MARJORIE CROFT 

To be a Winchell, a Baron von 

Snoop, 
Or an Irish G-Man — even so — 
'Twould be of no use; she'd 

discover your ruse, 
And her secrets you'd still 

never know. 



MARY CRESCENZA 

A quiet miss 

With a winning smile — 

This is Mary 

All the while. 



SARAH CROWELL 

•'Number, please?" you'll hear 

her say 
As you lift the receiver one 

day; 
And, we add, her temper's rare 
For one who has such bright 

red hair. 





FREDERICK DEACON 



What's in a name? I ask you, 
I'd always had the idea 
That a Deacon took life seri- 
ously 
Nor stopped to fool and jeer. 



JAMES DEVITT 

Red is an exception 
To the general rule; 
If he has a temper, 
He hides it well in school. 



MARGARET DONOVAN 

If we meet Margie fifty years 
hence 

We'll not pass her by, we 
feel — 

Remembered forever by class- 
mates 

For her braid and incompar- 
able squeal. 



ELEANOR DREW 

To teach the child his A. B. 
C.'s? 

To nurse through scarlet fe- 
ver? 

In whatever work she under- 
takes 

She'll emulate the beaver. 



FLORENCE DREW 

The lady dances, 
We very well know; 
Some day she may be 
The "star" of a show. 



ARLENE DRIES 

She hasn't a Packard to offer 
Or even an old Ford car — 
But come her way, and she'll 

give you 
A ride on the handle bar. 



THE PILGRIM 



DOROTHY DUNBAR 

"Shorty-Dot," so staid and 

small — 
Wishes she could be quite tall : 
She can't put her height to 

blame, 
For we like her just the same. 



ROBERT DUNHAM 

If you would be our life-long 

friend, 
(And you have what it takes,) 
Just share with us the samples 
Of the cakes your father 

bakes. 



THELMA FERIOLI 

Here is a keen collector: 
Of prints or rarest china? 
Alas! you're wrong! for Thel- 

ma thinks 
That doggie pins are finer. 



MARGARET FOX 

So different from the foxes 

We've ever read about: 

But should we call you "Reddy 

Fox"? 
We really are in doubt. 



CHARLES FRASER 

Charlie wants to be a dancer, 
Ask Dot, she surely knows: 
But what we've often won- 
dered is 
Who steps most on whose 
toes? 






JAMES FRAZIER 



Though human bipeds 
Aren't his game, 
We urge caution 
Just the same. 




LOUISA GALLERANI 

"Better to wear out than rust 

out," 
Says Louisa of her tongue: 
And upon the quiet classroom 

air 
Many questions she has flung. 



ELIZABETH GARDNER 

Four nights a week he travels 

down 
From Carver to our dear old 

town, 
Tell us — is Carl the reason 

why 
That happy twinkle's in your 

eye? 



MARIO GARUTI 

His "bow-tie" inspiration 
Has been such a sensation 
That his next creation 
May well sweep the nation. 



THELMA GARUTI 

Thelma is a dancer 

As everybody knows — 

And when it comes to solo 

work, 
She's right up on her toes! 



ALMA GILLI 

Alma is an optomist 

Who knows each day will 

bring 
Plenty of fun for the working 

girl : 
Yo! ho! wake up and sing! 



ELLIS GILMAN 

When we first knew him, he 

rode a bike, 
For he had to come so far, 
But now the boy's gone up in 

the world, 
And he drives a snappy car. 



10 



THE PILGRIM 



MARY GODDARD 

Our Mary's not contrary 
We have cause to know, 
A classmate more agreeable 
It would be hard to grow. 



LAWRENCE GOODWIN 

Lawrence is a bashful boy; 
If he should raise his head 
To meet a maiden's lifted eyes, 
He'd turn a fiery red. 



DOROTHY GOVONI 

She can beat teachers 
On one score at least: 
If questions were courses, 
She'd have a feast. 



GILDO GOVONI 

This boy owns a little red 

book — 
No, it's not full of addresses — 
ft contains time-tested excuses 
Which have served him well, 

he confesses. 



ALICE HALL 

O Captain! Our Captain! 
Those hockey scores well prove 
That for top rank in our 

school sports 
For no one you need move. 



DAISY HALL 

When our hockey team 
Unconquered was last fall, 
Who kept the balls from out 

the goal? 
Why — that was Daisy Hall! 




MARTHA HALL 

Laughing, joking Martha, 
In stature — rather short — 
But that's of no importance, 
You see — she's a good sport. 



ROBERT HALL 

Don't try it on us, Bob: we've 

seen you do it; 
(Now watch his face quite 

without guile 
And his quick, disarming 

smile.) 
Don't try it on us, Bob: we 

see right through it. 



DOROTHY HAMBLIN 

Our poems of the sea may 

show 
A lively imagination, 
But here's a girl who ought 

to write 
From close association. 



RICHARD HARLOW 

Lively, clowning, 
Full of glee — 
That description 
Fits Dick to a "T". 



ROSAMOND HARLOW 

Rossy's often late for school, 

Early rising she abhors: 

But when the time comes to 

go home, 
She's the first one through the 

doors. 



FRANCES HARTY 

"Haste" is Fritz's middle 

name, 
She's always in a hurry; 
Yet she can joke the whole 

day through 
And never seem to worry. 



THE PILGRIM 



11 



MARION HENDERSON 

Here comes Honey! 
Good-bye, gloom! 
She's sure to brighten 
Any room! 



DONALD HUGHES 

A clash of steel on steel 
Doesn't always mean a duel; 
It may be Brother Hughes 
In his flivver, late for school. 



RUTH HUNTLEY 

A visitor to our school 
Sees our Ruth — "Oh, My! 
I must have the wrong build- 
ing. 
What is this? Junior High?" 



HENRIETTE HURIAUX 

Though you sign yourself H. 

H.; 
We'll offer you two more: 
H for the very best of Health 
And for Happiness galore. 



WILHEMINA HURLE 

If you go to "Roseland" 
Any Saturday night, 
There you will find Wilma, 
For dancing's her delight. 



LOUISE IDE 

Louise is always cheerful 
As you are well aware, 
And even though she's tiny, 
Charlie doesn't care. 




HILDA JESSE 

She has changed her policy 
On one important rule: 
For now she's never tardy 
When she comes to school. 



JOHN KUHN 

Johnny has something 
Which resembles a car, 
And he uses this taxi 
For his friends near and far. 



ADDIE LELAND 

Our Addie is shy 
And she wears quiet clothes, 
But she always is smiling 
Wherever she goes. 



MILDRED LAPHAM 

Writing notes in study hall 

Is Mimi's specialty; 

She'll pass one any time she 

thinks 
The teacher cannot see. 



RALPH LAMBORGHINI 

You're our Demosthenes, 
You're our Calhoun — 
Ready to serve us, 
Asking no boon. 



ELLA LEMIUS 

She can't speak for others 
But for herself she knows 
That an even disposition 
Makes more friends than foes. 



12 



THE PILGRIM 



CURTIS LOWE 

In school you seldom hear 
him, 

He's the quietest of boys; 
But — wait until he gets out- 
side — 
Then — listen to the noise! 



ALTHEA LEWIS 

"You really ought to be in 

pictures," 
For we are sure you're better 

than 
Many of those lovely photos 
Taken by your "picture man." 



BARBARA MacDONALD 

Barbara likes to take long 

walks, 
She also likes to ride; 
She doesn't care which one 

she does 
If Willard's by her side. 



RICHARD MAINI 

You've proved an old saying 
Of some renown — 
"You can't ever keep 
A good man down." 



WILLIAM MALAGUTI 

If he ever uttered 
Ten words at a time, 
There'd be little point 
To this little rhyme. 



^)> ALB 



^ 



ALBA MARTINELLI 

Like a diamond in a rock pile 
You stand out from the rest: 
You do your work (and oth- 
ers', too,) 
In short, you are the best! 




OLIVER MATINZI 

He memorizes history 
That is, as a rule — 
He should be the finest patriot 
That we have in school. 



LUCY MAYO 

Lucy's not a government 

agent, 
As a postman we fear she'd 

fail — 
Even though she rides around 
In a car marked "U. S. Mail." 



JENNIE MAZZILLI 

"Be bright and cheerful" 
That's her creed — 
And in this way 
She will succeed. 



PRISCILLA McCOSH 

A sturdy buccaneer was she 
Who sang with all her might — 
And far above the others' 

tones 
Her alto filled the night. 



HELEN MICHEL 

We think that Helen's fortu- 
nate, 

For she's been given a chance 

To take a trip, when shu 
leaves us, 

To Germany and France. 



MARION MOREY 

You've heard the story 
Of Jack and Jill — 
Do you know the one 
Of Marion and Bill? 



THE PILGRIM 



13 



ELSIE MONTI 

As Mrs. Pencil 

In the play 

You did your good deed 

For the day. 



WEBSTER MOORES 

He's not Rudy Vallee 
Nor is he a Bing: 
But somehow we know 
That he likes to sing. 



BARBARA NEAL 

Barbara's thoughts in Kings- 
ton dwell, 

For Paul lives there, you 
know: 

When summer comes, in his 
Ford car 

A-riding they will go. 



FRANK NEAL 

'Most any girl would like to 
own 

His crest of rusty hair; 

But in the town of Framing- 
ham 

The "owner's" waiting there. 



EDNA NICKERSON 

We like the way you do your 

hair, 
Your blond curls look so 

sweet : 
And you're not so bad at 

hockey — 
You need take no back seat. 



EDGAR NICKERSON 

Dancing's an art, he's discov- 
ered! 

It isn't that he doesn't dare — 

But try as he may, we really 
must say, 

He still can't beat Fred As- 
taire. 




GEORGE NICKERSON 

His eyes begin to sparkle 
And wrinkle up with laughter 
When someone talks of Scotch 

girls, 
(For that is what he's after.) 



CYNTHIA OLDHAM 

Here's a young lady 
Who sews a fine seam; 
From linen and cotton 
She fashions a dream. 



ALEXANDER PEARSON 

We fear you have a tendency 

To emulate the cow: 

She chews her cud; you chew 

your gum; 
That's your weakness now. 



DORIS PEDERZANI YAciA\*A 



Doris plays her fiddle well, 
Her orchestra leads with 

zeal — 
And, when she takes Dr. 

Davis' place, 
Our pride we can't conceal. 



DOROTHY PERKINS 

If only you'd make up your 

mind, 
'Twould save us time and woe : 
For every time we write this 

poem 
With a different boy you go! 



DONALD PETERSON 

He seems to thirst for argu- 
ment: 

The "other side" he sees — 

For no matter what the ques- 
tion is, 

Donald disagrees. 



14 



THE PILGRIM 



PETER PETERSON 

He has a name that well sug- 
gests 

The ancient, sturdy Viking: 

And like them, too, an eye of 
blue, 

And for the sea a liking. 



VIOLA PETIT 

You've done it before 
And you'll do it again: 
You allow one minute 
Where we allow ten. 



FRANCIS PHILLIPS 

He's interested in engines, 
Jig-saws and chemistry, too: 
And, even though he's quiet, 
You'll never find him blue. 



ETHEL PIMENTAL 

Ethel is little 
And always most neat 
From the top of her head 
To the tip of her feet. 



FRANCIS POIRIER 

Now we have heard the story 
Of how much you like to 

sing- 
But must you say when you 

are done, 
"Now, don't I sound like 

Bing?" 






<^- 



LOUIS POLUZZI 



"Spinach's no diet — 
I won't even try it," 
Says Poluzzi, our sailor man; 
"But I want wim and wigor 
So I natcherlly figger 
I'll chew all the toothpicks I 
can!" 




ROBERT PROFFETTI 

A flash down the floor — 
A roar in the hall — 
Up goes our score — 
Bob plays basketball! 



ARLENE RAYMOND 

Arlene has points in common 
With the tortoise and the 

snail : 
If slow and steady wins the 

race, 
We know that she won't fail. 



HAROLD RAYMOND 

Hully's a whizz at basketball 

And deserves our honorable 
mention, 

But he really doesn't have to 
cough 

To attract that girl's atten- 
tion. 



RUTH RAYMOND 

Ruth surely knows her music 
And more, too, if you please: 
'Tis said she knows her alpha- 
bet, 
Especially the three C's. 



EVA REGGIANI 

Flying colors — 
Dancing feet — 
Eva's here 
And hard to beat! 



ELSIE REZENDES 

That she'll reach the top 
There's no denying, 
For here's one girl 
Who keeps on trying. 



THE PILGRIM 



15 



PRISCILLA ROBERTS 

She can lift her voice in song, 
She can charm us with her 

verse : 
Since she's guided by two 

Muses, 
For her no fear we'll nurse. 



DOROTHY ROGERS 

A lady in white she would be, 
A lady most gentle and fair; 
She would take your hand and 

lead you 
To — the dentist's chair. 



GERTRUDE RUSSELL 

As a wooden soldier 

You are really very good — 

But there are rumors 'round 

about 
Your heart's not made of 

wood. 



ELIZABETH RYAN 

When you see someone looking 

'round 
As though she'd lost a pal; 
That is our Elizabeth 
Looking for her Al. 



JOSEPH RYAN 

We find it hard to picture you, 
By merry music led, 
Shuffling gayly down the 

street 
Your hat on the side of your 

head. 



ELLEN SAMPSON 

Ellen's always smiling, 
She's always bright and gay — 
She brings a ray of sunshine 
Into our darkest day. 




KATHERINE SAMPSON 

Smartly dressed is Katherine, 
Happy, carefree, gay: 
She will greet you with a smile 
At any time of day. 



KATHRYN SAMPSON 

Kay and her chatter 
In Room Fourteen; 
When she's not talking 
It's calm and serene. 



ELINOR SANDERSON 

We search for a word that 
will suit you — 

You're hardly loquacious, we 
feel: 

We have it; tenacious will 
serve us, 

For you work with both cour- 
age and zeal. 



ROMEO SANTERRE 

We wonder where he keeps 

himself, 
Behind a door or on a shelf — 
He'd better choose a balcony — 
'Tis Romeo! Now can't you 

see? 



GEORGE SCAGLIARINI 

A sober or an impish air 
He can assume at will: 
He puts on the face that he 
Thinks will fill the bill. 



JOSEPH SCHLECHT 

Lovely plants and flowers 
About which sings the bard 
Impress our Joseph little: 
They grow in his back yard. 



16 



THE PILGRIM 



EVELYN SCHREIBER 

We wrote Shirley Temple 
To get her O. K., 
"Curley-Top" you may be 
If you can keep it that way. 



PETER SECONDO 

Pete has perfected a system 
He uses whene'er he's at large; 
"Crashing the gate," he calls 

it — 
But it's getting in free of 

charge. 



ROSE SHERMAN 

If for the town's most gener- 
ous girl 

You would like to pass, 

Just deed to us that car of 
yours : 

We'd try to buy the gas. 



JACOB SHWOM 

Since "American Culture" is 

finished 
And you still have so much to 

say, 
Just jump up on this soap box 
And we'll all shout, "Hurray!" 



FRANK SILVIA 



He has sworn 
To strive until 
He is mayor 
Of Chiltonville. 



GERTRUDE SIMMONS 

Whenever we see her beach 

wagon coming, 
We shut our eyes and start in 

running; 
For these new drivers, as we 

all know, 
Don't bother with signs which 

say, "Go slow." 




ROSE SIRRICO 

Great friends of the ages 
Have often been men, 
But to their true friendship 
This quatrain we pen. — (Vide: 
Ingenito.) 



ANTONE SPALLUZZI 

We may call our Tony 

"Dopey," 
But it's not because he's slow; 
Give him a football and a field 
And then just watch him go. 



EVELYN STRASSEL 

For choosing clothes and 

wearing them 
This girl has, a flair: 
She can tell you, if she will, 
What the well-dressed miss 

should wear. 



MILDRED STRASSEL 

Why don't you join a Walk- 

a-thon? 
You've had much practice, 

we've been told — 
And, if you left all those books 

(?) behind, 
First place you might even 

hold. 



ALVIN TAVARES 

Alvin tried to play the tuba 
In assembly, loud and clear, 
He said, "The music goes 

'round and 'round 
But why doesn't it come out 

here?" 



ANTHONY TAVERNELLI 

You play the sax for Bunny 
And dress with taste, 'tis true: 
"The Lochinvar of '36" 
Is the name we give to you. 



THE PILGRIM 



17 



DORIS TAVERNELLI 

Trimly dressed 
In tailored clothes; 
Doris is serious 
Everyone knows. 



>* 



DANIEL TRIBOU 

To see you go a-walking 
Down Manomet's Main Street 

(?) 
Must give all the maidens 

there 
A most unusual treat! 






-GLAS TUBES 

k Rub-a-dub-dub, 

Five girls and a Tubb (s) 
We wonder which one 
Is going to get Doug? 



RUTH VALLER 

"Babe" lives far from "city 

limits" — 
In fact, out in the sticks; 
But we all agree that she's 
The "Venus of '36." 



DOROTHY VANDINI 

We know you're sweet on 

Bobby 
And feel there is no other: 
But, when we ask how Bobby 

is, 
We sure don't mean your 

brother. 



ELIZABETH VAUGHN 

Elizabeth is charming: 
In fact, she rates A+, 
She is a wow in every sport 
Quite invaluable to us! 




PAULINE VIAU 

Does Polly want a cracker? 
The question rates a zero: 
She wants to know how she 

can tell 
Which boy to make her hero. 



ROBERT VOLK 

They call him "Sonny" 
In spite of his size: 
His good disposition 
To that must give rise. 



ALBERT WALTON 

His pastime is unusual, 
Now you just take a look 
And you'll see Albert Walton 
Learning how to cook. 



ALTON WHITING »v- 

My goodness! what's the mat- 
ter? ^-cX 

Can't you manage your own 
feet? 

As a Scotchman in a High- 
land Fling 

You took no rear seat! 



JEAN WHITING 

Sodium and chlorine 
Did make her halt: 
But she'll live it down 
If she's worth her salt! 



FREDERICK WOOD 

On most topics of the day 
He won't rise to the bait: 
But he'll hazard an opinion 
On the next heavyweight. 



18 



THE PILGRIM 



GEORGE WOOD 

We know what your ambition 

is, 
May you reach your goal: 
A famous author you would 

be, 
Read from pole to pole. 



GERTRUDE WOOD 

Woods, woods 
Everywhere — 
But we haven't 
One to spare! 



VIRGINIA WOOD 

"Who's afraid of the big bad 

Wolfe?" 
The three little piggies ask: 
If Jin had her way, she'd let 

the "Wolfe" play 
And take all the piggies to 

task! 



MAY INGENITO 

Great friends of the ages 
Have often been men, 
But to their true friendship 
This quatrain we pen. — (Vide: 
Sirrico.) 




MILDRED WRIGHT 

If we should have an amateur 

hour 
And you should play a song 
On that harmonica of yours, 
You'd never get the gong! 



AMY YOUNG 

We don't know much about 

her 
For she hasn't been here long: 
But, if she keeps on making 

friends, 
She surely can't go wrong. 



BURNHAM YOUNG 

"Bunny" and his Boston-bag! 
What would he do without it? 
He studies hard, no duty 

shirks — 
There is no doubt about it. 



ELI ZAVALSCOFSKY 

We doubt if they can make it. 
But we'll let all comers try: 
Now in your surname can you 

find 
A z, v, k, and yl 



THE PILGRIM 



19 



CLASS PROPHECY 



ALL aboard! The sight-seeing bus, 
Black Maria, is just leaving! Our 
destination is to be the fair city of 
Mymplouth where 99 44/100% of the 
inhabitants are members of that unfor- 
gettable class of 1936 from old Plym- 
outh High. 

Step up, madam ! Take the seat in the 
rear beside the buxom gentlemen with 
the epileptic necktie and the nauseating 
cigar. Here we go ! 

Ladies and gentlemen, I, Vincent 
"Jelly" Baietti, am your guide, and our 
bus driver is the eccentric Philip 
Chandler, who never in his life has hit 
anything but pedestrians. 

Upon entering the city, the first build- 
ing we notice is that in which the bowl- 
ing alleys of Messieurs Poluzzi and Tav- 
ares are located. Louis (I know him 
personally) has discarded his famed 
wooden toothpick for a platinum one 
gayly encrusted with diamonds. Alvin 
is futilely trying to explain the differ- 
ence between a strike and a spare to a 
few interested ladies : namely, Althea 
Lewis, Lucy Mayo, and "Shorty-Dot" 
Dunbar, who are desirous of learning 
the fundamentals of this healthful pas- 
time. 

There, standing in front of the build- 
ing with his thumb in the air, and sur- 
rounded by awed youngsters, is Robert 
Volk, author of the "Hitch-hikers Com- 
panion" and "87 Methods of Soliciting 
Rides." 

Let us leave the bus and in a leisurely 
fashion wander through the town and 
its many buildings. 

In a spotless white office, above the 
alleys, we discover Dr. Dorothy Rogers, 
leading feminine dentist, skillfully ex- 
tracting bicuspids and eye-teeth from a 
yawning mouth, the owner of which is 
Charles Fraser, inventor of the cubical 
polka dot, now employed by The George 
Scagliarini Polka Dot Corporation. 
When better dots are polkared, "Scag" 
will polka them! In the waiting room 
are Margaret Donovan, Mary Goddard, 
Evelyn Schreiber, and Priscilla Roberts, 
all featured in that new stage produc- 
tion, "Dust on the Doorknob," written 
by that ingenious author, Douglass 
Armstrong. (Incidently, it is now play- 
ing in Lawrence Goodwin's Opera 
House.) 

Up one flight more, we go into a 
spacious gymnasium where Mario 
"Spike" Garuti holds sway. Here the 



tired business man may reduce a bay- 
window to a mere skylight. In the 
ranks I believe we see Bill Bagnell, 
chairman of "The Wiser Wisecrack 
Club." 

Over on a mat is Ward Clarke, 
world's heavyweight wrestling cham- 
pion, casually tying knots and charlie- 
horses in the legs of Daniel Tribou, who, 
we must confess, is deeply engrossed in 
a "Wild West Weekly." 

Across from the gymnasium is the of- 
fice of Francis Poirier, owner of the 
Shaggy Nag Stables. We are ushered 
into the outer offices by Jean Whiting, 
his secretary. Behind us come tramping 
Donald Hughes, Frederick Deacon, 
Robert Hall, and Edward Brewster, all 
stockholders in the Suffogansett Race 
Track. They intend to build a race track 
on Brown's Island in Plymouth. 

Leaving this building, we journey to 
an adjacent one. On the street floor is 
the "Modiste Moderne" managed by 
Thelma Ferioli and Pauline Viau. Vain- 
ly trying to decide which hat to buy is 
Miss Margaret Fox, assistant adviser on 
the Adviser's Advice Council. In the 
back room, Rosamond Harlow and Betty 
Gardner are creating more ravishing 
chapeaux. 

On the next floor is a door with a 
mysterious - looking sign on it. No, 
madam, it is not a Chinese Laundry. 
That is the insignia of the Theta Phi Psi 
Fraternity, to which belong those six 
heroic gentlemen (?) who battled 
through Trigonometry and Solid Geome- 
try without a tear. Entering, we see 
grouped around a televisor, munching 
peanuts and Tootsie Rolls, Deane 
Beytes, the human slide rule, Peter 
Secondo, Fred Astaire's successor, 
George Nickerson, noted critic, Frank 
Neal, who recently translated "Anthony 
Adverse" into pig-latin, Warren Brad- 
ford, that little atomizer of gossip, and 
George Campbell, world's champion pre- 
varicator. 

Directly above the club room is Tele- 
vision Station WPHS where Elizabeth 
Ryan has just rendered Tony Tavernel- 
li's latest hit, "Schenectady Scuttle," ac- 
companied by Doris Pederzani's all-girl 
orchestra. The owner of the voice an- 
nouncing the next program is Richard 
Harlow. 

"Our next program will be the daily 
cooking lesson by Thelma Garuti, presi- 
dent of the 'Sisters of the Double-boiler 



20 



THE PILGRIM 



Organization.' Her article today will be 
'How to construct a cake' and 'How to 
Slaughter a Smoked Shoulder.' " 

As we wish to see all the town and 
must apportion our time, we are unable 
to stay longer. Let us journey further 
afield. On our way to the street, we pass 
the "Woman's Get-together Club." Ad- 
die Leland has just addressed the group 
on "How to Shake a Salt Shaker." In 
the interested audience we glimpse Alice 
Banzi, Alice Hall, Amy Young, Sarah 
Crowell, Kathryn V. Sampson, and 
Mildred Strassel. 

On the street again, we journey to the 
backyard of the mayor, Harold Ray- 
mond, where the Lam-Bor-Ghini Cine- 
ma Studios are located. A new super- 
thriller, "The Goon and the Gink," star- 
ring Alton Whiting, Priscilla McCosh, 
and Elsie Monti, has just been com- 
pleted. Much praise is due the director, 
our own Jacob Shwom, for such marvel- 
ous work. 

Attracted by a buzz, we peer into a 
corner of the studio where we see Ruth 
Huntley, Mildred Lapham, Barbara 
Neal, and Katherine T. Sampson indus- 
triously ( ?) playing bridge during their 
lunch hour here at the studio. Their 
chief topic of conversation concerns that 
book of the month "Dazed in the 
Daisies" or "Asleep Under a Tulip" by 
that most promising authoress, Alba 
Martinelli. We see that that nationally 
famed kibitzer, Connie Caldera, has just 
wowed them with another of her ancient 
"original" jokes. 

Now, my friends, as it is time to eat, 
we must adjourn to the "Tin Coffeepot" 
owned by Evelyn Arruda and Alma 
Gilli. We are greeted by Eleanor Drew, 
hostess, who tells us the meal is on the 
house. From the kitchen, we catch the 
fragrant aroma of Albert Walton's 
"Miscellaneous Soup" which contains 
just what the name suggests. 

Look ! Over there on the stool, busily 
enveloping a hamburger, is Douglas 
Tubbs, an industrious and Lochinvarian 
young architect, who recently completed 
the "Peter Peterson Community Cen- 
ter" in Washington, D. C. 

Ah ! Here's our soup, or are the 
plates just wet? After a lovely repast 
we depart for further investigation of 
this city. 

Sitting under an orange umbrella in 
the civic center we find Joseph Ryan, 
busily directing traffic. Janet Clark, 
Katherine Christie, and Cynthia Oldhan 
have just crashed head-on and caused a 



terrific mixup. (Nice scenery, isn't it, 
girls?) 

In the distance we hear the presses of 
"The Funnell" owned and operated by 
Florence Drew. Buying a copy of the 
paper, we note that Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court, Alexander Barbieri and 
his eight cronies, Donald Peterson, 
Charles Barengo, Antonio Carvalho, 
Prentiss Childs, Curtis Lowe, Ellis Gil- 
man, Webster Moores, and Antone 
Spalluzzi, have just declared that a tax 
on flavored tooth paste is constitutional. 

We also note that Eva Reggiani, the 
famed fan-dancer, has just left for 
Sweden to visit her mother. 

We also note with pride that our own 
"Red" Devitt has won the international 
hog-calling contest. Some voice, that ! 

Now we shall again enter our dilapi- 
dated omnibus to journey to the Dun- 
ham Foundation Hospital where we 
shall see the latest in diseases and op- 
eration gowns. 

We are in luck. A patient is just be- 
ing carried in on a stretcher. It appears 
to be Gildo Govoni who, the driver says, 
was pouring hair tonic on' his newly- 
grown mustache when the bottle slip- 
ped. 

He is received by nurses Marion 
Morey and Louise Ide, who quickly 
usher him into the X-ray room. Doctors 
Courtney and Zavalcofsky are inter- 
rupted at their thrilling game of back- 
gammon, but they willingly rush to 
further maim and harass their patient. 
Leaving the hospital, we pass to the as- 
sembly hall, and, if we are quiet, we 
may be able to peek in. 

In the ranks of the alumnae nurses 
who are witnessing a premier per- 
formance of the new movie production 
featuring the Scionne Sextuplets, we see 
many old friends, Elizabeth Belcher, 
Natalie Caldera, Mary Crescenza, and 
Arlene Raymond in the front row, slyly 
whispering to one another upon a mat- 
ter of utmost importance (Arlene's new 
hat, no doubt). 

Over here we can see Louisa Gal- 
lerani, Dorothy Govoni, Hilda Jesse, 
Ella Lemius, Ruth Raymond, and Elinor 
Sanderson brazenly playing "Tit-Tat- 
Toe" on the back of Rose Sherman's 
spotlessly white uniform. They are 
brought to order by Professor Barbara 
MacDonald who severely reprimands 
them. 

Leaving the hospital, we reach the 
center of town again in a surprisingly 
short time. As we walk along the thor- 



THE PILGRIM 



21 



oughfare, smoke and the odor of singed 
hair attract our attention. Very much 
concerned, we search for the source. 
Peeking into a beauty shop, we find it. 
There in a chair is Marion Beauregard 
heroically undergoing all the horrors of 
a beauty treatment. Miss Edna Nicker- 
son is doing the deed, at the same time 
rapidly chatting with Ruth Valler, who 
appears to have dropped in just for 
a pow-wow and confab. Also, in the 
shop are Dorothy Perkins, leading 
sampler for the Taste-More Lollipop 
Corp., Ethel Pimental, coloratura for 
the Alexander Pearson Shoetree Corp. 
Hour, Gertrudes Russell and Wood, two 
exceedingly busy housewives, who, no 
doubt, are in for the "Viola Petit Spec- 
ial" temporary permanent. 

Unaccustomed to such brutal sights, 
we find it necessary to depart. 

Now, let us again enter our convey- 
ance and remain parked for a short 
while. I shall point out to you any and 
all personalities who chance to pass. 

The couple approaching now is Mr. 
and Mrs. Francis Phillips, big game 
hunters. They have just returned from 
an expedition to Mars where they suc- 
ceeded in capturing a Martian Kluztok, 
(pronounced "Kluztok"). 

This group of ladies now drawing 
near in very great haste must be going 
to Frederick Wood's Bargain Basement. 
From left to right, they are Francis 
Harty, Wilma Hurle, and Jennie Maz- 
zilli. There is a sale of guaranteed rio- 
run stockings in Mr. Wood's basement. 
(Wait until they find out they're made 
of steel wool) . 

Following close behind, we see Ger- 
aldine Balboni, picking up the bundles 
that Ellen Sampson has dropped after 
attempting to recover them from Vir- 
ginia Wood. (Excuse the girls; they 
are trying to make the train that leaves 
for Clark's Island in 2.5 min.). 

Be careful ! These four faces now 
passing belong to G-men. Sh! They 
are owned by Robert Proffetti, Romeo 
Santerre, Frank Silvia, and Edgar 
Nickerson, respectively. They must be 
working on a case. Hi ya, gents ! 

Here's Betty Boudrot, assistant nurse 
to Dr. George Wood, veterinarian. 
There are Martha and Daisy Hall who 
do a sister act in the Henriette Huriaux 
Hilarities. Well, well, there goes Burn- 
ham Young, who succeeded in crossing 
a bee with an eagle to secure a more 
bountiful supply of honey. 

Oliver Matinzi, the truant officer, just 



whizzed past. I wonder who he's after 
or vice versa? 

There goes Sarah Clark, president of 
the Housewives' Leisure Club, and a 
few of her members : Jesse Callahan, 
Dorothy Vandini, and Marjorie Cec- 
carelli, with Marion Henderson and 
Helen Michel bringing up the rear. 

Here comes Marjorie Croft, famous 
aviatrix. She just flew around the moon 
in four months ! To whom is she talk- 
ing? Oh, I know them, Arlene Dries 
and Mildred Wright, two employees of 
the "James Frazier's Korn - Killer 
Kure." 

Approaching us now are Misses Dor- 
othy Hamblin and Elsie Rezendes, in- 
ventors of the fourth dimensional knit 
and purl stitch. 

There, coming out of Elizabeth 
Vaughn's Delicatessen, are Gertrude 
Simmons, world champion of the tennis 
court, and Evelyn Strassel, the girl 
who says "Thank you" before giving 
you the wrong number on the Telephon- 
isor. 

Sakes alive and dead, too ! Look at 
the time ! We have to mosey along. 
And now, ladies and gentlemen, if you 
will designate your destinations ... I 
shall endeavor to deposit you upon your 
respective doorsteps .... 

Dashed off in a moment of clairvoy- 
ancy and lunacy by 

G. Campbell '36 



OVERHEARD: CHOICE REMARKS 

IN Chief's History Class: Spaghetti 
grows on trees in Italy. (Who said 
so?) 

We ain't learned nuthin' yet in this 
class! (When she read the proof, Mrs. 
Raymond said it must have been in 
English.) 

I'm positive I passed the paper in 
because I copied from the guy in front 
of me. 

It wasn't on when I took it off. 

He who laughs first laughs last. 

Don't make a mountain out of a mole. 

Look at the air in the road ! 

Question: Who said, "Speak for 
yourself, John?" 

Answer: Benjamin Franklin. 

Gee, those three guys make a nice 
pair. 

Do you mean to situate I said that? 

By Luigi & Vincenzo 
The Irish— "G-Men" 



22 



THE PILGRIM 



~'C3III []IIIIIIIIIIIIHI1IIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIMIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3II MIME3llllllllllll[]lllllllllllllllll|[3IIIIIIIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIIMt3llllllllllll[]IIIIIIIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIIIIC]lllllllllllinillllllllll|[]|||||||||||l(^ 

Thoughts on the Advent of Commencement 1 



KEEP CLIMBING 

I wandered in a land 

Where all was sunshine and joy. 

I lay down 'neath a shade tree 

Where sleep o'ertook me and I dreamed. 

A mountain rose before me. 

On its sides, Youth was eagerly climbing. 

'Twas the Hill of Success they were mounting 

With the Temple of Faith at the top. 

I saw one who was agile and eager 

And left his companions behind. 

He was Genius. 

When Pleasure and Pride beckoned, 

He lingered a while and his followers pushed on. 

I saw another climber who made his way along. 

He patiently moved each obstacle 

While keeping his eye on the top. 

He was Wisdom. 

He resisted the call of the sirens, 

While others forsook their paths 

And were led away to the huts 

Of Ignorance and the hovels of Misery. 

I noticed one of these abductors 

In her gentle, easy way, drawing 

More deserters to her innumerable court. 

She was Laziness. 

As I watched this endless crusade, I thought, 

"How happy are they who ascend to the top!" 

A being appeared before me. 

She looked at me, then spoke, 

"Success may take thee to heights unknown, 

But I alone can lead thee to Happiness. 

I am Truth." 

As I reached out to touch her, my slumber was 

broken. 
The sunshine was gone, 
And the shadows of evening had descended 
On that beautiful land. 

Arlene Raymond '36 



PROSPICE 

As one who, cast above a cataract, 
Naught but a broken paddle for his guide, 
Tries wildly, futilely, to reach the shore, 
And failing, flings it far afield, to fall 
Among a patch of goldenrod, while he 
Shrinks down in his canoe and waits for death, 
The roaring growing louder in his ears, 
I gazed with trepidation on the road 
Which wound ahead of me up rocky steeps 
Impossible to scale without a guide. 
"Alas," cried I, "how useless all the toil 
And struggle of poor mortals bound to earth! 
The way is tortuous, and my eyes are dimmed 
From striving to see through the fog of life." 
Then spake a voice from out the blue of heaven : 
"Do not despair, O mortal, for the way 
Is clear to those who put their trust in God! 
He is thy guide, however steep the path 
May seem to those who look for help in man!" 
That is the lesson, Class of Thirty-six. 
Believe not you can self-sufficient be — 
Strive not for selfish gains and men's acclaim — 
Seek to be guided on your way through life! 
Thus only will you gain the goal you seek: 
Thus only may you win divine reward! 

Priscilla Roberts '36 



THE RIVER 

I stood before a wondrous map 

And meekly watched its Maker 
Trace our course. He spoke, 

And pointed to the highlands: 
The Class of Nineteen Thirty-Six 

Began here where a multitude — 
Five score or more — of tiny streams 

Came together in their course 
To form an ever-widening river. 

His finger followed down the course 
As in my mind I saw the shoals, 

The rapids we had safely passed. 
Again the great One slowly spoke: 

"Growing ever stronger, swifter, 
You raced on toward a roaring torrent 

Where all the smaller streams unite. 
Each single unit here is lost: 

While mingling with the others, 
Your class, too, joins the common flood 

To spread throughout the river." 
I protested, ever hoping 

My class would stay as one — 
But from the map the Being turned 

And calmed my fears by saying, 
"Even if those waters once divided 

Shall never flow alone again 
And your classmates soon to be parted 

Perhaps shall never meet again, 
The cherished mem'ries of these years 

Will live forevermore." 

Elizabeth Belcher '36 



THE SILENT MESSAGE 

On a grassy knoll I lay and watched the clouds 
Float silently across the blue expanse of sky; 
Each seemed to know wherein his journey lay, 
Intent, and questioning neither how nor why — 
On softly-sandalled feet they moved, and fal- 
tered not, 
As if each one were by its own ambition stirred 
To heights of fame, here on this arching sky. 
But, as I gazed, there rose a murmur in the 

breeze, 
A hint of coming coolness everywhere, 
And through the heaped-up clouds, the sun 
Had disappeared, and sullen, burdened seemed 

the air. 
I must go, I thought; still I lingered there, 
Content to glimpse anew each darkening cloud; 
And while I dreamed, the sun, a golden proph- 
ecy, 
Shone through the haze, to gild each one more 

fair. 
So, class of nineteen thirty-six, may we 
Strive valiantly, by steadfast courage led, 
Though strangely dark at times our way may 

be, 
To persevere, nor fail to look ahead. 
And through the years that God to us has given, 
May we, inspired by higher, worthier things, 
Not mourn the flight of passing time, 
But toil, content, accepting what life brings. 

Dorothy Perkins '36 



-illllllh1tC3inillllllt<C3lllMrilIIMC3MltlMllt)lC31lllllllllllC3MllltlltritC3l ■■■■C3MMIlllIlllC3IIMIC3IIUMIIIIIICailllllIllll1C311IHIIIHIICail11IllIllltC3IMMIUIIIIC3IIMIIIfIItrC3liri IIC3 IllC^lil .~= 



THE PILGRIM 



23 



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1 MOTION PICTURE REVIEW I 



She Couldn't Take It 

Doubting Thomas 

G-Men 

The Iron Duke 

Lady Tubbs 

Les Miserables 

No More Ladies 

Orchids To You 

Public Hero No. 1 

Alibi Ike 

Bad Boy 

Here Comes The Band 

Under Pressure 

Freshman Love 

Captain Blood 

Red Heads On Parade 

Daddy Long Legs 

Little Caesar 

Mutiny On The Bounty 

Five Star Final 

Animal Kingdom 

The Milky Way 

Show Them No Mercy 

The Perfect Gentleman 

Dangerous 

The Chatterbox 

Mister Hobo 

The Man Who Knew Too Much 

When A Man's A Man 

Little Man, What Now? 

Here Comes Trouble 

You May Be Next 

The Singing Kid 

Last Outpost 

Age of Indiscretion 

The Big Broadcast 

Breaker of Hearts 

Broadway Melody of 1936 

Crime and Punishment 

We're Only Human 

Pace That Kills 

Your Uncle Dudley 

The Good Fairy 

The Great Impersonation 

The Melody Lingers On 

Mr. Dynamite 

One Way Ticket 

Shadow of Doubt 

Traveling Saleslady 

Our Little Girl 

Forsaking All Others 

The Gilded Lily 

The Irish In Us 

Vagabond Lady 

We're In The Money 

Strike Me Pink 

Way Down East 

The Lady Consents 

I Dream Too Much 

The Payoff 

Go Into Your Dance 

Black Sheep 

The Daring Young Man 

The Farmer Takes A Wife 

The Flame Within 

Goin' To Town 

Goose and the Gander 

Hold 'Em, Yale 

Splendor 

This Is The Life 

The Public Menace 

These Three 

Don't Bet On Blondes 



Althea 

W. Bagnell 

Garuti, Gilman, Govoni, Goodwin 

Dr. Davis 

E. Belcher 

The Flunkers 

Vinnie Baietti 

Mrs. Raymond 

Proffetti 

Gildo Govoni 

Fred Zaniboni 

Basketball 

English IV Period IV 

Pete Secondo 

Mr. Bagnall 

Rose, Sarah, Neal, M. Fox 

Phil Chandler 

Mr. Romano 

No more homelessons 

Pilgrim 

Biology 

Lunch counter 

Incoming Freshmen 

Frannie Poirier 

Pat McCosh 

Connie 

Bobby Hall 

Lamborghini 

Mario Garuti 

Matinzi 

Peter Peterson 

To flunk 

Webster Moores 

June (neuter gender) 

High School days 

Room 11 's assembly 

Tubbs 

Our Class Song 

Pupil vs. Teacher 

Faculty 

Homelessons 

Mr. Shipman 

Our office girl 

George Campbell 

"Beauty Eternal" 

Mr. Poluzzi 

OUT! 

Getting all our points 

Betty Gardner 

Ruth Huntley 

Cap Whiting 

Pauline Viau 

M. Donovan 

Natalie Caldeira 

After the treasurer's report 

We're Graduating! 

Ward Clarke 

His graduation partner 

Spalluzzi 

Commencement Day 

T. Garuti 

Jacob Shwom 

Dicky Harlow 

Charles Barengo 

Kay Sampson 

For graduation clothes 

Richard and Eleanor 

Our football squad 

Girls' Dressing Room 

School Days 

Tavares 

Arlene, Betty, Arlene 

Ruth Valler 



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24 



THE -PILGRIM 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 

Continued from Page 5 

To Miss Dowling: A wheelbarrow in 
which she may carry all her belongings 
to the new school. If it is snowing, 
however, she may send a requisition for 
a dog-sled. 

To Miss Johnson: A pair of cas- 
tanets to prevent wear and tear from 
snapping her fingers. 

To Miss Rafter : A pair of shoes, 
with cleated heels, to be used for exact- 
ly the same purposes as usual. After 
all, shoes do wear out. 

To Miss Lang: An automatic "desk- 
lifter-upper." We realize that it is ex- 
tremely difficult and annoying to reach 
down and get paper from those lower 
drawers. 

To Miss Wilber: A Senior Latin 
class whose ranks contain at least one 
boy. 

To Dr. Davis : A magnetic baton 
which will attract the eyes of our 
"music lovers" to prevent the embar- 
rassment of a Senior's booming bass 
voice cutting in upon a soprano solo. 

To Mr. Romano : A bright red scooter 
that he may police the study hall swiftly 
and effectively. 

To Mr. Packard : A class of budding 
Edisons and Einsteins who will not 
claim that an "ohm" is a dwelling place. 

To Miss Carey : A rocket ship, that 
she may spend her week-ends and va- 
cations in France. We seek tofrembve 
the unpleasantness of mal de mer. 

To Mr. Knowlton : Our regret that 
we did not meet him sooner, and our 
sincere hope that he enjoys being with 
us. 

To Mrs. Garvin: A hockey team just 
half as good as our girls made it. 

To Miss Jacques : A French class 
with surnames that can easily be pro- 
nounced in French. We know how awk- 
ward it is to say "Monsieur" in flawless 
French and the last name . . . not. 

To Miss Coombs: A pair of winged 
sandals and a Western Union uniform 
in which to flit, appropriately garbed, 
about the new school building on her 
daily errands. 

To the Class of 1937 : Our congratu- 
lations, and, we confess, our poorly- 
disguised envy since it is to be the 
Senior class in the new school. (Oh, 
well ! they'll see lots of us as "P. G.'s"). 

To the Class of 1938 : Our hope that 
they can find enough outstanding per- 
sonalities to serve as class officers. 

To the Class of 1939: A Big Ben 



(first it whispers, then it shouts), to 
awaken them in the morning now that 
their hours have changed. 

Signed, sealed, and mailed with a 
three-cent stamp from the luxuriously 
furnished offices of Bulrushe, Bulrushe, 
Bulrushe, and Weed, and to be executed 
by whatever courageous soul deems it 
advisable. 

Hereunto, whereunto, and whatunto, 
we have affixed our signatures : 
Alice the Goon 
Jenny the Gink 
Minnie the Tewt 
Eugene the Jeep 

Warren Bradford '36 
Douglass Tubbs '36 

£UIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIOIIII!IIIHOIIIIIIIIIII[]IIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIOIIIIIIIIIII[]ll£ 

CLASS SONG 

UP AND ONWARD 

Friends and classmates, 
jj Up and onward! 3 

= Toward the goal 1 

1 That we pursue: i 

9 Forward ever, 3 

| Backward never* I 

= Seek to make f 

3 Our hearts more true. 3 

| Bright the future 

Gleams before us; 
3 We have youth — 

Life's greatest prize, 
1 May its fervor 

g Help to lead us, g 

| Upioard, onward, 

May we rise. 

Friends and classmates, 
= Up and onward! §. 

□ Look not back g 

To days gone by, 
i Always forward 

To the treasures g 

| Which beside 

Our path may lie. 
Reaching upward, 

Never downward, 
e For the bright | 

And not the dim, 
g Let us keep S 

Our lives unsullied 
Till we chant 

□ Our triumph hymn. S 

| Friends and classmates, 

5 Up and onward! 

= One gate has § 

Been closed behind: 
5 There are others i 

M Open to us, = 

// we strive § 

=. With heart and mind. = 

= Shirking never, e 

Working ever, 
| Light illumines = 

| Souls that climb 

Upward, onward, 
= Ever onward, = 

e Till we conquer 

Even Time. 
= Sarah Clark '36 = 

"illUIIIIIIIIIIIOIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIII uiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiioniiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiuS 



THE PILGRIM 



25 



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I TRY THESE ON YOUR PIANO 1 



Stay As Sweet As You Are 

Easy Come, Easy Go 

I'm Misunderstood 

Whose Honey Are You? 

Sweet Music 

Cling To Me 

When I Grow Up 

The Gentleman Obviously Doesn't Believe 

Thanks A Million 

Life Begins At Sweet Sixteen 

At Your Service, Madame 

I Can Wiggle My Ears 

A Little Bit Independent 

So Nice Seeing You Again 

Swing It 

Cheer Leader Charlie 

A Picture of Me Without You 

Will I Ever Know? 

I've Got to Get Hot 

Love Is Just Around The Corner 

What's Mine Is Yours 

Calling All Cars 

I Love Louisa 

The Traffic Was Terrific 

Got A Brand New Suit 

Dancing With My Shadow 

They Cut Down The Old Pine Tree 

You're Driving Me Crazy 

I'm A Dreamer 

Hate To Talk About Myself 

I Woke Up Too Soon 

Mine Alone 

I Feel A Song Coming On 

Haunting Me 

Country Boy 

Going, Going, Gone 

I Feel Like A Feather In The Breeze 



Dot Perkins 

Ten cents a week 

A. Lewis 

D. Vandini 

At basketball 

Eva's dress 

Dot Dunbar 

Brud Goodwin 

For the diploma 

Yeh? Where were we? 

D. Beytes 

Campbell 

Back to Nature Colony on Clark's Island 

An "A" on our report card 

D. Pederzani 

A. Martinelli 

Says Cap to Phil 

What was Feb. 19 (besides Poluzzi's birthday) 

Before going into R. 10 

So's prosperity, but we've never seen it 

Homelessons 

Rainy day at 12:30 

Bob 

Phil Chandler 

Bill Bagnell 

Vinnie 

For Louis 

History homelessons 

Fred Deacon 

Boys' cooking class 

Dick Harlow 

Or not at all, says Janet 

Pat 

Study hall teachers 

P. Childs 

Class of '36 

Jinny 



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What 



Is Your 

BALLOT 



Choice? 





Literature 


ii 




Cinema Selection 




(1) 


Ivanhoe 


9 |j 


(1) 


David Copperfield 


. . . ! 25 








(?,) 


Merchant of Venice 


6 II 


(2) 


Tale of Two Cities 


. . . | 26 








(3) 


David Copperfield 


39 !| 


(3) 


Mutiny On The Bounty 


.i..|71 


(4) 


Tale of Two Cities 


40 || 


(4) 


Little Women 


. ..1 14 


(5) 


The Virginian 


18 || 






<■ • 1 


(6) 


Hamlet 


6 || 




Favorite Actor or Actress 








. 


(7) 


Oregon Trail 


10 ii 


(1) 


Shirley Temple 


. . . 1 28 








(8) 


Silas Marner 


16 ii 


(2) 


George Arliss 


. . .| 21 









|| 


(3) 


Helen Hayes 


| 5 








II 


(4) 


Ginger Rogers 


| 41 


II 


(5) 


Clark Gable 


1 14 


|| 


(6) 


Franchot Tone 


1 18 


II 

II 


(7) 


Katherine Hepburn .... 


112 



26 



THE PILGRIM 



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n en fr a ye ^en, 
veTS ha'* See " 
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/rf s four y eat ^'9rj, 
sour yezrJ of *Tr 04f ' ■<•/ 

^W it fas he/c/jojs /• ' c ". 
h its Mutiny, Sa/np ^ *s 
r f r-eze/ ihrouyi /Vs*,** 
Bui for tAff/bUSo /,£■?% 
Wt the dfrun of Co/% », ^^e 
M> Sorroujs A*re u, e . A(, e. 
insure est /u/ r ^ be/ . / > "* M e 
Our yotfl h#*£eet, o ^5 ^<V 

lj/,e*ce ' Ue r^jy '**?„ 

3 v f & }le*r», ue r»°. '« ty L 

out- **•"""* £* i*> 

-gut Ter>,eii,6ej;„ 9c Sjoh* 

fa o ur CJrf! 

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T/r,J ?**>* U! 'fa* ff** 

■£»■„> y 



THE PILGRIM 



27 




FOR THE LOVE OF A LADY 

TI/TANY deeds, wise and foolish, have 
been done for the love of a lady. 
How wise the Frenchman who remarked 
"Cherchez la femme!" For always in 
the background lurks the feminine in- 
fluence — more often than we know she 
has laid her mark on history, as you 
will see. 

We have often heard the story of 
Ponce de Leon — so often, perhaps, 
that its romance is dulled by repeti- 
tion. But his story is really more ro- 
mantic than one realizes, if only the 
truth as it is told here were known. 
For this is the tale of what sent him 
on his quest. 

Leon was a rather small town in 
Spain, in those fifteenth-century days, 
and Ponce was not an outstanding 
figure in it. He had always lived 
there, and while he took an occasional 
part in its activities and, for a time, 
lived a mildly exciting life with his 
various bachelor contemporaries, he 
was inclined to be self-effacing. He 
was different from the rest. Especi- 
ally was he fond of reading and 
studying, even although education and 
books were scarce. As the years passed, 
and he grew older, he continued to 
live by himself, surrounded by his 
books. He was very fond of reading 
Sir John de Mandeville's travels, and, 
although these accounts were grossly 
exaggerated, he spent many hours 
pouring over the volumes and taking 
imaginary voyages of his own. He 
never married, and, as time passed, he 
grew more and more content with his 
manner of living. 

However, as so often happens to men 
of his type, as he neared fifty he had 
the misfortune to fall in love with a 
lady many years younger than himself. 



Poor Ponce! The thought of her dis- 
turbed his hours, waking and sleeping, 
and, as the situation grew worse, he 
had no rest. Her face came between 
him and his book; her voice haunted 
him night and day; in short, his whole 
life was disturbed by her. 

Finally he could endure the situation 
no longer. One night, as was the cus- 
tom, he engaged a musician to soften 
the heart of the lady with seductive airs 
and create the proper romantic atmos- 
phere. Together they went to her court- 
yard, and soon the plaintive strains of 
a guitar filtered through the heavy scent 
of mimosa which hung about her win- 
dow. A slight figure appeared behind 
the bars, and Ponce's heart suddenly 
swelled. Surely, surely she must listen 
to his suit and give answer. 

He stepped from the shadow into the 
moonlight and in low, impassioned 
tones pleaded his cause. But alas! 
When he had finished and stood with 
lowered head awaiting her word, only 
a light laugh sifted through the grating 
which separated them. 

"But no, Senor Ponce — you are too 
old ! Go back to your musty books, and 
leave love-making to those younger than 
you." 

Oh, the cruelty of youth! Stooped 
with sorrow, Ponce returned to his 
lonesome abode and turned to his books 
for solace. He opened a volume of 
Mandeville's travels, and, scarcely real- 
izing what he read, started to scan an 
ancient map. 

"Here lies Ind," he read, the familiar 
words bringing comfort. "Diamonds 
grow as large as oranges, and the people 
are green and yellow." 

Suddenly his eye was caught by a 
tiny bit of lettering in one corner, 
which had hitherto escaped him. 



28 



THE PILGRIM 



"Here lies the Fountain of Youth, 
and men worship oxen." 

Youth, the foremost wish of his 
heart ! A fountain where he who drinks 
is made young — if Mandeville had 
found it, why could not he? Perhaps 
he was a bit deranged by sorrow — who 
knows? However, on the strength of 
Mandeville's statement, his search 
began. 

The rest of his story is history. We 
all know of his long, futile search for 
the fabulous fountain ; of the hardships 
and heart-break he endured before he 
died, at the end of one of his voyages, 
a "weary and heartsick old man. 

One wonders whether the cruel heart 
of the lady were touched, or whether she 
ever knew of the futile search to which 
she had driven him. Truly, strange are 
the ways of a lovesick man ! But Ponce 
lives on, in history, as the explorer who 
discovered Florida, and not as he really 
was — only an incurable romanticist 
with an unhappy heart — and all for 
the love of a lady. 

Priscilla Roberts '36 



BARGAIN (?) MATINEE — 15c 

r\ID you ever go to the movies on a 
Friday afternoon with the hope of 
thoroughly enjoying the pictures, only 
to regret, as the afternoon wears on, 
that you did not take a walk or stay at 
home and listen to the radio? Most of 
us have experienced this disappoint- 
ment. It is not the pictures which cause 
this discomfiture, but both the physical 
and mental attitude of our neighbors. 

Sitting back comfortably with visions 
of keen entertainment, our attention is 
suddenly and painfully withdrawn from 
the screen by a thump or thumps on 
the back. Leaning forward, we gradu- 
ally recover our mental equilibrium suf- 
ficiently to concentrate on the films. By 
the time that our courage has returned 
enough for us to ease back into our seat, 
we hear the familiar "Rise, please," of 
the usher. After responding reluctantly 
to his courteous request, we once more 
sit down and try to collect our thoughts 



and belongings, upon which we discover 
that the person next to us is comfort- 
ably seated upon our coat sleeve. There 
follows a period of indecision as to 
whether we'd best try to retrieve it now 
or wait for a more opportune moment. 
We decide on the latter, and for a short 
time all goes well. Becoming intensely 
interested in the plot, the emotionally 
inclined among us are nearly on the 
verge of tears, when from out of the 
vast darkness, comes a high falsetto 
laugh followed by a series of loud guf- 
faws. To add to this distraction, a small 
child in the row in front of us makes it 
plain to his mother and, incidentally, to 
all within hearing distance, that he 
wants to go home. Occasionally his wish 
is granted, but more often, to our sor- 
row, it is not. Suddenly it dawns on 
him that there might be something of 
interest in the unexplored region under 
the seats. Forgetting him for a moment, 
we are again reminded of his presence 
by a muffled shriek, "I can't get out!" 
Whereupon he is vigorously extricated, 
and deposited in his seat by his irate 
mother. There, to our great satisfac- 
tion, he remains for the rest of the 
afternoon. 

To return to the picture, we find that 
it is nearly finished. As the curtain 
closes, pandemonium breaks loose. One 
more bargain matinee is over ! What a 
bargain ! Dorothy Perkins '36 



I DREAMED A DREAM 

I dreamed a dream: 
And in that dream I saw — 
A world of splendor 
Of purple and gold, 
Of light and beauty. 

Beautiful jewels sparkled in a heavenly dome; 
And people strolled along 
And lived in perfect harmony. 
I woke at dawn 

And thought my dream untrue, incomprehensi- 
ble — 
And so I looked from my window, sighing, 
And marvelled at the vision 
Of the sun, surging upward on its journey — 
Casting rays of purple and gold 
Over the rolling hills. 

And jewels scintillated from dew-dripped bowers. 
A man passed by whistling — 
Reveling in a world of beauty and peace. 
I thought — why dream, when all about 
God has given us beauty in Nature 
Oft-times unappreciated. 

Mildred Lapham '36 



THE PILGRIM 



29 



THE FATES WILL ATTEND 

RESTLESS flashes ofl lightning glowed 
in the sky and were quickly extin- 
guished as if by some unknown hand. A 
rising wind soughed through the trees 
and sent leaves whispering along the 
muddy road. The storm had momen- 
tarily ceased, but gave warning of strik- 
ing again with renewed vigor. 

A horseman, his mount slipping and 
sliding, came down the lonely lane, try- 
ing vainly to urge his foam-covered 
beast to a trot. A bolt of lightning 
cracked with earsplitting violence close 
at hand. The horse reared, his rider 
shouted, and was pitched headlong to 
earth. The rain came slashing down to 
lash with derisive whips the cursing 
man and the fast-disappearing mount. 

James Clyde, stupidly picking him- 
self up, futilely brushed wet mud from 
his clothes. The wind, hurrying the 
rain along, beat against his back to 
arouse him from his stupor. Gathering 
his cloak around him and recovering 
his hat, he hunched himself against 
the storm and set off down the road. 
He had not gone far when water began 
to trickle down his neck. Growling 
and snarling, he clutched his cloak about 
his neck and slithered on. A coy little 
drop insinuated itself inside his boot. 
Its companion followed and soon more 
hastened to work for his discomfort. 
Wet autumn leaves passed their slimy 
fingers over his face, and branches 
reached out to seize him. 

Just like his brother to make a will 
keeping him waiting for ten years to 
inherit what was rightfully his, and 
then insert a clause forcing him to claim 
the house at midnight no later than 
September 8, 1838. Well, soon he would 
have no reason to regret this excursion. 
If that sniveling lawyer got there on 
time, James Clyde would soon be in a 
dry bed, and what is more, a rich man. 
What a time could be had with that 
money ! A thousand parties like the one 
last night, he promised himself. 

In a concert of thunder and lightning 
he arrived at a dripping iron gate. In 
the weird illumination of the storm, he 
saw the house against the sky. He shiv- 
ered. The old place looked gloomy, like 
a fitting rendezvous for the ghosts that 
the village folk believed to inhabit it. 
Tugging and pulling at the gate, the 
new master of Clyde House struggled to 
enter his domain. At last he wrenched 
open the gate and in a fit of impatient 
anger slammed it shut and viciously 



kicked his inanimate tormentor. Def- 
initely out of breath, Clyde climbed the 
weed-grown drive to the house. The 
place oppressed him, heavy with knowl- 
edge and five centuries of combating 
the elements. It seemed to squat pro- 
tectingly over the surrounding land. 
The bars that its neurotic, previous 
owner had had placed over the windows 
gave it a distasteful prison-aspect. He 
reflected that James Clyde would have 
to be careful or he might find himself 
living in a prison ; but not for long, not 
for long. 

Mounting the steps, he hesitated be- 
fore the heavy door. He shivered. What 
might be behind it? He frowned at his 
thoughts and muttered to himself, 
"Don't be a fool, Jim, my boy. There's 
nothing there that can harm you. 
Ghosts make the very best caretakers." 

Inserting the key and forcing the 
rusty lock, he stepped into the house. A 
rush of dusty, damp air slapped his face. 
Heavy with the damp and neglect of 
years, the house was not a pleasant 
place. A gust of rain reminding him 
that it was drier inside than out, he 
entered and closed the door. Lighting a 
candle that he took from his pocket, he 
looked disgustedly about. He held the 
candle up. Revealed in the unmerciful 
light, his lined, red face and bloodshot 
eyes told of a young man prematurely 
old as the result of concentrated dissi- 
pation. 

Heavy layers of dust covered every- 
thing. The house was just as it had 
been when the body of his older brother 
had been borne from it to the grave. 
No one had had enough interest or 
thoughtfulness to have the house pre- 
pared after the disappointed heir had 
rushed from his brother's funeral, as 
drunk with the wine of new-found free- 
dom as he was to be so many times on 
more material spirits. 

The room lay under the heavy dust 
of years of waiting for life to come to it 
once more. Once beautiful furniture 
stood with mold on once-gleaming, 
satin-smooth wood, and rot working in- 
sidiously in beautiful brocade uphol- 
stery. Cracked paintings, rotting tap- 
estries, a small bronze draped in shroud- 
like cobwebs — all evidences of the ma- 
licious workings of time. This was the 
reception room that Robert had lavished 
so much money upon in order to sustain 
the e'egance of the name of Clyde in its 
country-wide glory. Here for two cen- 
turies the Clydes had, on the first of 



30 



THE PILGRIM 



every month, met the neighborhood gen- 
try. The family had owned the most 
land and possessed the most influence 
for so long that they were potential 
kings in their own domain. This glory 
of other times now hung in rags. James 
had never taken up his duties as squire 
with the small allowance from the in- 
come the will allowed — and never would. 
The room seemed to resent that; it hud- 
dled sullenly in its shadows and very 
reluctantly emerged as James's light 
sought it out as he advanced. 

Eddies of dust whirled vaguely after 
the disturbing feet. Clyde walked to the 
door that led into the hallway. He in- 
tended to go to the dining room where 
he would endeavor to build a fire, if 
there were any wood there. This room 
was too big, too full of memories. He 
didn't like it. 

The lightning flashed. A draught 
blew out his candle. Silhouetted in the 
open doorway down the hall stood a 
menacing figure, arm uplifted. The 
back of his scalp prickled and crawled. 
Cold sweat beaded his brow. His breath 
came with a painful, hoarse whistle. 
The light faded. Blackness rushed 
about him. He stood rooted with sud- 
den, unreasoning terror that tore at 
his sanity. The world stood still. Wa- 
ter dripped from his cloak to his boots. 
He could hear it drop. Cold and damp- 
ness permeated him to the bone. At 
any moment he expected that avenging 
figure to rush at him from the darkness. 
His mind groped for reason telling him 
that this couldn't be true, — there were 
no avenging spirits. But his heart and 
soul screamed to him, "The spirit of 
Robert demands retribution. You are 
going to die — die foully as he did !" 

Realization came to him that in the 
very room in which he still stood, his 
brother had met him for the first time 
with the scales fallen from his eyes. 
James remembered everything he had 
striven to forget. He thought of him- 
self at twenty-two, a spoiled young man, 
pampered by an adoring, blind, older 
brother who saw in him only what he 
wished to see. Robert, weighted with 
responsibility, much older than James,, 
delighted in giving James the pleasures 
that he never could have. Almost an 
invalid, neurotic and fearing death, he 
was suspicious and demanding of all 
save the brother he worshipped. Not 
even being sent down from Oxford with 
scandal that was the current gossip at- 
tached to him, persistent rumors of un- 



savory nature, his reputation as the 
gayest of young bucks, or enormous 
debts, could shake Robert from his de- 
lusions and dreams. He wanted James 
to sow his wild oats and return to set- 
tle down in the country with him. 

When he had started to exert gentle 
pressure on James to draw him from 
his pleasures, the young man resented 
it, drew back, and finally came into open 
rebellion. James remembered that fight- 
ing against gentle Robert was like 
punching a feather pillow — he was soft, 
easily hurt, but resilient. And then 
finally Robert had left the country and 
gone to London where he heard stories 
that had made him gasp and come 
hurrying back for James' denial — a 
denial that couldn't be convincingly 
given. In this room Robert had stormed 
and threatened, pleaded and cajoled, 
and under James' sullen science had 
blazed into anger. James, his allowance 
cut off, had stood and listened and seen 
his soul stripped to its essential ugli- 
ness by a disillusioned, maddened man 
whose world had crumpled about his 
ears, to leave only dust and ashes in his 
mouth. And in James' resentful, hat- 
ing eyes had glowed and finally blazed 
— murder. 

Robert had not seen the terribleness 
of his brother's passion, and in the fol- 
lowing days had come to regard him as 
a wayward lamb. But he never could 
regain his old confidence and blind love 
for the man for whom he had had such 
hopes. And, unknown to James, he 
changed his will. He could not keep the 
money and lands from the rightful 
heir, but he had the power to keep him 
from squandering them, or so he 
thought. 

James had begun cold-bloodedly to 
plot to kill his brother. The last vestige 
of decency fell from him as he chafed 
under the sameness of each succeeding 
day and the absence of all that he had 
possessed — things for which he would 
sell his soul. And in the end he had 
heard the doctor announce the death of 
Robert, and knew that he had succeeded. 
He had known unholy joy and mentally 
blessed the poison that had given him 
the power to regain freedom. 

There had been no suspicion. Every- 
one was delightfully gullible, for in their 
minds such a deed as had been per- 
petrated could not be conceived of in 
one of the Clydes. James had rejoiced 
— until the will was read after Robert's 
Continued on Page 32 






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THE PILGRIM 



31 




PILGRIM STAFF 
First Row: Audrey Dutton, Mary Bodell, Jean Whiting, Alba Martinelli, Elizabeth 

Ryan, Priscilla McCosh. 
Second Row: Elizabeth Belcher, Janet Clark, Lucy Mayo, Dorothy Perkins, Arlene 

Raymond. 
Third Row: Warren Bradford, Francis Schied, Alan Hey, Lois Brewster, Mrs. 

Raymond. 




HONOR GROUP 

First Row: Mrs. Raymond, Elizabeth Belcher, Alba Martinelli, Jean Whiting, 
Dorothy Perkins, Priscilla McCosh, Margaret Fox, Arlene Dries. 

Second Row: Vincent Baretti, Lucy Mayo, Pauline Viau, Deane Beytes, Lawrence 
Goodwin, Katherine Christie, Dorothy Vandini. 



32 



THE PILGRIM 



Continued from Page 30 

funeral. Then he had cursed and storm- 
ed and threatened to break the will, but 
he knew it was unbreakable, and it 
made him wait ten years for the bulk of 
the estate. And one of the clauses said 
that he must meet the lawyer there or 
the estate would pass to his cousin. It 
named a generous sum that he would 
possess if he managed the estates, and 
a much smaller one that he would have 
if he left. Robert had futilely tried to 
bring James to his senses through his 
weakness for comfort, luxury, and pres- 
tige — to bring him solidity through 
the years before trusting him with a 
fortune. But he had calculated wrongly 
and James had raged from the house to 
the freedom and debauchery that held 
him in their powerful grip. So he had 
lived foil ten years, in debt most of the 
time, dragging his name through filth, 
anticipating the day when he would 
avenge these years by squandering his 
patrimony just as Robert had feared he 
would. 

James' mind came back to the pres- 
ent. He knew that it had been but sec- 
onds that he stood there. Still he felt 
years older. Another flash of lightning. 
James sobbed with joy. It hadn't 
moved ! Then, suddenly he began to 
laugh hysterically. Tears of relief and 
self-derision rolled down his cheeks. The 
suit of armor ! He had seen it a thou- 
sand times before and yet his over- 
wrought brain had believed it an 
avenging spirit. Ridiculous! 

Fumbling in his pockets, he again 
found a light for his candle and strode 
down the hall to confront the suit of 
armor. With a mace fastened to the 
hand and the arm upraised, it looked 
lifelike indeed. But a spirit. — Ha ! He 
remembered that he had even thought 
of having Robert die apparently by be- 
ing accidentally struck down by the 
mace. He jeered at himself, snorted 
with disgust, and continued on his way. 

Entering the dining room, he immed- 
iately kindled a fire in the great fire- 
place. A good blaze going, his accus- 
tomed bravado again came to the fore. 
James ripped open a cupboard door and 
snatched a bottle of wine. Impatiently 
knocking the top off on the table, he 
raised the bottle to his lips and drank 
deeply. 

After several drinks he felt himself 
fit to battle the devil, so, dragging a 
chair to the fireside, he sat down. Re- 
plenishing the fire and drink occupied 



him until midnight when his watch told 
him that the lawyer was due. But Law- 
yer Willows did not come. The minutes 
dragged- James got up and began to 
fling impatiently about the room. Still 
no lawyer ! Wind and rain beat against 
the windows and, when an occasional 
heavier gust hurled itself against the 
pane, James started, looked about, and 
resumed his restless pacing. 

A disturbing thought had come to 
him. Could it be that Robert had sus- 
pected him, that this seemingly foolish 
test was a trap to betray him? He 
could almost feel the noose tighten 
around his neck. He gazed about like a 
hunted animal, his shifting, red eyes 
watching for anything suspicious. 

There was a tapping at the window. 
He glided quickly, silently to look out. 
There was no one there. Tap, tap — 
again. A shiver ran up his spine. Then 
he saw the inquisitive limb that was the 
culprit. As if in obliging confirmation, 
it swayed once more and knocked. Mut- 
tering and cursing, he resumed his pere- 
grinations. 

A log fell in the fireplace, sending 
gleaming sparks up the chimney. Wa- 
ter dripped on the window-sill outside. 
He could hear his vdatch above the 
crackle of the fire. 

And then, looking up, he saw his 
brother's accusing eyes menacing him. 
He told himself savagely that it was 
only a portrait. It couldn't harm him — 
he was flesh and blood; he could de- 
stroy that canvas if he pleased. But 
when he moved, the eyes seemed to fol- 
low him — accusing — reproaching — 
wistful — angry — menacing. Robert's 
eyes begged him again to say it wasn't 
true. 

He could endure it no longer. Mad- 
ly he tore the portrait from the wall 
and cast it into the fire. It blazed up. 
But Robert's eyes were the last part 
to be consumed by the hungry fire. They 
seemed to reproach him even from the 
ashes. 

The house suddenly became unendur- 
able to James. The walls seemed to 
close in on him, the very chairs seemed 
hostile. The atmosphere of the room 
choked him. A horrible shriek came 
from the chimney, something came 
swooping down it. His brain flamed 
— something snapped inside him! He 
rushed from the room, gasping sobs 
of terror — something was chasing 
him ! As he stumbled over the thres- 
hold past the armor, he was hit 



THE PILGRIM 



33 



a stunning blow on the back of his 
head. Dazed, a little trickle of blood 
coursing down his neck, his mind was 
filled with the thought of assassins, 
spirits, the thought of his brother — 
something had attacked him — had de- 
sired his life! 

He flung the door open and its crash 
behind him gave added impetus to his 
headlong flight. He reached the gate. 
He wrenched at it. It did not open. 
In mad rage and terror he tore and 
clawed at it, but it would not yield. He 
looked over his shoulder. Shadows ad- 
vanced on the path. They assumed 
ghostlike forms. With a shuddering, 
sobbing scream he gave one last tearing 
wrench — in vain! He collapsed on the 
gate and hung there. 

The wind made his cape flutter and 
sway, ruffled his hair. The rain stream- 
ed down his face. He didn't feel it. He 
would never feel it. 

In the house a bewildered owl wad- 
dled about the room, blinking and pro- 
testing his precipitate journey down 
the chimney. The embers of the dying 
fire painted the room a dull bloody 
red that gleamed and ran as the 
fire flickered. The owl stalked from 
the room, passed the still-swinging 
mace, and flew out the door. The 
rain beat in. The wind slowly swung 
shut the door. With the click of the 
latch, the house relaxed, resumed its 
impregnable, indomitable watch — sat 
gazing inscrutably down on the thing 
hanging so limply on the gate. 

In the peace of the new morning a 
shocked farmer beheld the blood-chilling 
sight of a man, his face horribly con- 
torted, grimacing from the gate of 
Clyde House, staring starkly at some- 
thing too horrible for sight. 

Lawyer Willows and the doctor iden- 
tified the body. The doctor had remark- 
ed pensively, "As I have said, the blow 
on his head, as yet unaccounted for, 
could not cause death, so he must have 
received some shock that was too much 
for his over-strained heart." He looked 
at the terror-stamped features of the 
body at his feet and shuddered uncom- 
fortably. He muttered to himself, 
"From the look on his face, I should say 
he died from sheer, stark fear!" 

"It will always be a mystery to me," 
Willows grumbled to the doctor, "why 
that madman had to come and die of 
heart failure in the place he seems to 
have deemed unworthy of his attentions. 
Anyway, the estate passed to his cousin 



night before last when James Clyde was 
spending the time in which he was to 
claim his inheritance in a drunken orgy 
with his friends !" 

Phyllis Johnson '37 



THE LITTLE PEOPLE 



The sweet wind 

Kissed by banshee lips 

Gently — 

Softly sighs through the thatch. 

In the low hush 

Of the night, 

I can hear their voices 

Tinkling 

Clear in the stillness, 

And they lull me to sleep, 

The Little People — 

They whisper in my ear and lull me to sleep. 

In the yellow of the day 
Where are they? 

They are the sparkle of the sunbeam 
That streams slantingly through the panes 
On my morning porridge. 
They hide in the deep thatch 
Of the roof, 

And tickle the feet of the swallows. 
They twist and curl the thin smoke 
From Grandpa's pipe, 
And they polish all the silver in his hair. 
Mary Bodell '37 



MUSICAL MYSTERIES 

O sweet music, 

Why mystic power have you 

That by one peaceful strain 

You can lift our souls 

From despair's darkest depths. 

From those cruel clutches 

Of that pulsing arm of pain? 

You are a sweet release 

From the bondage of suffering! 

You are full of comfort 

To the aching heart! 

But why do you sweep us 

From the heights of ecstacy 

With your heart-rending tones 

And your wild moaning? 

Tragedy o'ertakes us and we are sad; 

The chrysalis of our soul is torn 

And grief seeps through. 

Music may show us 

Hate, sorrow, love, or joy 

In a few throbbing strains. 

Elizabeth Vaughan '36 



WINTER 

Azure sky, blue and fair; 
Shrilling wind, bleak and bare; 
Frozen earth, hard and dry; 
Melting snow, piled up high; 
Quiet brook, choked and still; 
Muddy leaves dead and chill; 
Ghost-like trees, black and cold; 
Rising sun, bright and bold; 
Winter. 

Jeannette Hatton 



34 



THE PILGRIM 



c'"!imniiiiit] i nniimiminmiiimmciiiiiimiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiicjiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiimiiiiiniiiiiiiiminiiiimiimt^iiiiiiiiiniM 



Sophomore Poetry Page 



MY CATALOGUE OF LOVELY THINGS 

A morn in spring when the dew-drops cling 

To the boughs of the waking trees; 
When the birdies sing from a tree-top swing 

Which rocks lightly in the breeze; 
A pine tree tall near a waterfall, 

Roaring ceaselessly through the night; 
A sea-gull's call before a squall, 

Which catches it in full flight; 
A bluebird's wings; cold, bubbling springs, 

This is my list of loveliest things. 

Barbara Paty 



MY CATALOGUE OF LOVELY THINGS | 

A winding road through towering mountains | 

A rumbling, tumbling waterfall, 

A beautiful park and sparkling fountains, 

A tree in winter or summer or fall. 

The woods and their fragrant smells, 

The sky with all its phases and changes, 

An ivy-covered church with its ringing bells, | 

The sea with all its moods and dangers; 

A river flowing solemnly on to the sea, = 

A quiet nook near a warm Are, 

A book that interests and pleases me, = 

And music from flute, violin, or lyre, = 

This is my catalogue of lovely things. | 

Arnold Torrance 3 



Variations On A Theme 



LIFE'S LOVELY THINGS 



MY CATALOGUE LOVELY THINGS = 



My idea of life's lovely things 

Is neither wealth nor treasure of kings. 

A lonely pine upon a hill, 
A brave but battered sentinel; 

A tiny golden butterfly, 

Poised on a flower, wings lifted high; 

A mother robin with her brood, 
Her happy mate asearch for food; 

An angry, roaring, surging ocean, 
With spray afly, and wind in motion; 

A field of daisies, fresh and white, 
Wet with the dew of a summer's night; 

Tis God's own works, both great and small, 
That are the loveliest things of all. 



The lilting sweetness of the tune 
The thrushes in the springtime croon, 

The gentle rustling of the leaves 
Caused by breezes through the trees, 

The pitter-patter of the rain 
As it falls on my window-pane, 

A field of daisies in the sun 
Nodding their heads till day is done, 

A happy, bubbling little brook 
Scurrying to some secluded nook, 

The mellow strains of a guitar 
Sounding at twilight from afar, 

This is my catalogue of lovely things: 
And great is the joy to me it brings. 



Jeannette Hatton 



Leah Lodi 



.-cjiiiiiiiiiiiujiiiiiii n iiiinnmniimiin Milium n i niiiiiiiiiinu uiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiioiiiimiiioiiiiiimiiu ci" 



THE PILGRIM 



35 



MONEY IS AS MONEY DOES 

OUNRISE always has been one of Na- 
^ ture's better gifts to man. After the 
dark reign of night, a bold sun comes 
up from behind a hill or a clump of 
trees to start a new day. It chases away 
the fears that may have been born dur- 
ing darkness and makes the gloomiest 
and weariest creature hopeful and ex- 
pectant. It sweeps away troubles the 
way a broom sweeps away a cobweb. 
Troubles, like cobwebs, appear again, 
but temporarily there is happiness in 
forgetfulness. 

The break of day in Townsville was 
as lovely as usual. A great naming ball 
appearing in a pink and golden sky 
banished a few fluffy clouds. Workers 
who set out at an early hour took a deep 
breath of the invigorating air. It was 
fortunate, indeed, to be alive on such 
a day as this. 

A figure appearing on the crest of 
the hill behind which the fiery ball was 
becoming visible was unobservant. Bent 
and weighed down by the implement 
with which he made a living, "Old Joe" 
made a grotesque silhouette against the 
now blazing sky. He had travelled along 
this same road at the same hour for a 
number of years, but he had never 
noticed the dawn. With his head bent 
down, he saw only stones and dust, his 
eyes blind to the beauty about him. Per- 
haps his attitude toward life might 
have been different, for often a gorge- 
ous vision makes one resolve to try to 
beautify a drab world. 

Since he had been journeying to 
Townsville for a number of years, he 
was well known. His "Have you any 
scissors to sharpen today?" was famil- 
iar to all as he trudged slowly through 
the streets, his bell making a mournful 
sound. Once it had seemed to challenge 
the world, so loud and persistent it had 
been. Now it seemed resigned to its 
fate as was its master. 

"Old Joe" was thinking what he had 
thought through the years as he ap- 
proached his destination : 

"Another day has begun. My back is 



broken but I must keep on. My pile of 
money must increase, not diminish. My 
money ! My own money ! All mine ! 
No one else can have it. I want it all 
and more. There is more and I can get 
it. The Whites, Smiths, and Vandykes 
want scissors sharpened today. Maybe 
axes, too. Yes, I can get more, more 
money. That's what I want." 

Busy thus with his planning and 
scheming, he did not hear the rumble 
of a powerful motor. As his desires for 
wealth shut out unselfish deeds, they shut 
out the warning of approaching death. 
How could "Old Joe" know that in the 
black speck that was rapidly nearing 
was a fugitive who had stolen money? 
How could he know that a victim of the 
desire for riches was racing toward 
him? The young man driving the flash- 
ing vehicle was desperately thinking : 

"I'll get away! I must! Nothing 
shall stop me! Nothing. I don't care 
who or what it is. I'll get free. I 
won't be caught. It's impossible. I 
won't let anyone get me. Not me. No 
cop is gonna get hold of me. Over my 
dead body he will. This bus oughta 
go faster. I'll soon find out. It sure 
does go. Now we'll see." 

Thus two beings meditated, two who 
were to ruin each other's plans. 

As the car hastened toward the 
turned figure, no one was near to warn 
the misguided man. 

Meeting the obstacle in its path, the 
car teetered for a minute or two on two 
spinning wheels and then, as though 
having made up its mind, tipped to one 
side and hit a tree which offered wel- 
come shade during the hot summer 
days. In this way, two men who want- 
ed wealth, met death. 

Elsie Monti '36 



THE BLACK PLAGUE 

Heaps of corpses, stinking piles 
Of rotten flesh and clotted blood: 
Decaying mounds of sun-scorched dead — 
The very atmosphere breathes death. 

Human food for rats and flies, 

That swarm around and land 

To feed on choicest morsels 

From the "Grim Reaper's" butcher shop. 

Bodies blackened by the plague 
Are carried in the dead of night, 
And dumped like garbage into pits 
To swell the rising hill of dead. 

Norman Jones '37 



36 



THE PILGRIM 



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D. Tubbs '36 
A. Barbieri '36 



THE PILGRIM 



37 



NOTHING VENTURED — NOTHING 
GAINED 

A GREAT deal of satisfaction is to be 
derived from any accomplishment; 
the more difficult the problem, the deeper 
the sense of pride we secretly feel. If 
we were to employ someone to mow our 
lawn, we should naturally expect him to 
work for us — and work faithfully un- 
til the job was finished. Then we would 
feel obligated to pay him. But do we 
realize that every day of our lives we 
are working for ourselves? More valu- 
able by far than money is our reward; 
we either lower ourselves or rise a little 
each day. Our employers are ourselves, 
and we often expect too much with little 
effort from those employers. Why do 
we feel that, when working for our- 
selves, if we fall a little short it will not 
matter ? 

We are told that, from our labors, we 
get back exactly what we put into them. 
There is a simple formula in physics 
which applies to all machinery and, al- 
though we do not realize it, has a direct 
bearing on human machinery. It is this: 
output equals input. That is, the work 
accomplished is proportional to the 
effort expended. However this formula 
is only theoretical, applying to machines 
of one hundred percent efficiency, and 
such a machine, mechanical or human, 
has never been produced. Frictions of 
many sorts cause resistances which 
hinder the smoothness of the machine 
until the output equals only a fraction 
of the input. Likewise only a part of 
the work we do for ourselves is realized ; 
only a portion of our labors will be 
rewarded. Therefore, to get ahead we 
must do a little more than we are ex- 
pected to do in order to keep our stand- 
ard as high as we would have it ! 

While we are working for others — 
working to gain money, striving to 
become more independent, we are 
broadening our vision, learning new 
things, adapting ourselves to new situ- 
ations. According to the manner in 
which we meet our rising problems, we 
are either working for ourselves or 



against ourselves. Little do we realize 
that the narrow, hypocritical people we 
often find around us once faced the 
question — to work for themselves or 
against themselves. Alas! they started 
out on the wrong foot. Most of them 
are still where they began. Now the 
problem is ours let us begin right and 
work for ourselves. 

Jean Whiting '36 



CONEY ISLAND 

ONE August morning I awoke with a 
wonderful glad-to-be-alive feeling 
inside. My dad and I were spending two 
whole weeks with my aunt and uncle in 
New York City. It was a glorious, sun- 
ny day, and that night I was going to 
a place I'd always heard of and wanted 
to see, Coney Island. Why shouldn't I 
feel happy? 

For a five-cent fare the subway took 
us for what seemed to me an amazingly 
great distance. As we left the subway 
and walked down a midway on the 
Island, I felt as if I were in a fairy 
land come true. Hundreds of lights 
flashed and sparkled and twinkled all 
around us. The sound of harsh, nasal 
voices filled the air with invitations to 
"walk right up and see the only living 
two-headed woman" and to "step right 
up and witness the greatest acrobatic 
show on earth." 

Dad and I began by purchasing a 
strip of tickets for the first amusement 
park we came to. We rode on ferris 
wheels, whips, magic carpets, wobbling 
barrels, and roller coasters. 

One thing that I shall never forget is 
our ride on what was called the 
"Horses." At the top of a flight of 
stairs were several horses similar to 
those on merry-go-rounds. Each horse 
was attached to a single track which 
went down a steep grade at first, and 
then up a hill on tracks like those of a 
roller coaster. The ride was more 
thrilling than a roller coaster, for we 
had to sit on the horse's back with 
nothing to hold on to except the reins. 
After we once got started, everyone 
wrapped his arms around the horse's 
neck because this gave him a much safer 
feeling. After the ride was over, we 
found that the only way by which we 
could get outside into the main park 
again was by going through a door be- 
side which a clown was standing and 
grinning at us. On crossing the thres- 
hold, I found myself on a large stage, 
and staring up at me was an audience 



38 



THE PILGRIM 



of at least three hundred people! I 
gazed at them, spellbound for a min- 
ute, and then hurried toward the door 
leading- off the stage. In the middle of 
the stage a gust of wind blew my skirt 
up suddenly, and when I quickly bent 
over to hold it down, my hat blew off. 
As soon as I reached for my hat, up 
went my skirt again. Finally I let my 
hat blow away and rushed off the stage 
amidst the laughter of the audience. 

After that, Dad and I went down and 
became part of the audience. It was 
extremely amusing to watch others go 
through the same process I had. 

When I was back in bed late that 
night, I thought over everything that 
we had done and decided that, if any 
home were in New York, I would make 
it a point to visit Coney Island every 
single week. 

Muriel Priestley '38 



FLOOD 

SPRINGFIELD was one of the cities 
unfortunate enough to have been 
inundated by the recent floods. It was 
my good fortune to have been able to see 
the destruction in this catastrophe. 

When we first entered the city, we 
found ourselves in a serious position. 
We had come two hundred miles for 
the sole purpose of seeing the flood and 
then only to find we could not enter 
the city through the lines of militia. 
Our luck was with us, though, as it had 
been all day. We thumbed a ride on a 
bread truck going into Springfield. It 
was carrying an emergency load of 
bread for the refugees so it was allowed 
to pass. The driver sympathized with 
us and hid us in the back with the load. 
Almost suffocated by the odor of the 
bread, we were left within the city 
limits. The city was in complete dark- 
ness in the flood area, and the only 
means of getting about was by flash- 
light or automobile lights. In the dark- 
ness we almost walked into the water 
which was flooding the lower streets. 

Tired and sleepy, we sat on a doorstep 
and listened to the conversation of the 
people who had been driven from their 
homes. Every so often we would hear a 
child ask for water, but the mother 
would refuse because of the lack of un- 
contaminated water in that district. As 
we rested, up to the curbing floated a 
boat from which naval reserve officers 
disembarked and told us to move on. 
We moved up the block and were about 
to rest again when a military patrol 
came to the street and told us to keep 



moving. In despair we decided to see 
the sights. 

In the business district gasoline 
trucks, pumps, and other pieces of ma- 
chinery were being used to pump the 
water from the department store cellars 
and apartment buildings. The res- 
taurants that could do business were us- 
ing candles and gas light. All around 
were groups of people talking of the 
damage to their homes. In spite of the 
flood, though, everyone was cheerful 
and few grumbled at their bad fortune. 

The Red Cross had in its service 
private cars which were carrying sick 
refugees to the base. The organization 
was doing a splendid job of caring for 
the homeless people. It had received a 
grant of land and a large mansion from 
the will of an old man who had died re- 
cently. Here an electric light system 
had been installed and people were 
being cared for night and day. 

At the time we decided we needed 
some sleep and planned a campaign to 
get bed and lodging. Wo found readily 
enough that none was to be had. Re- 
membering a cemetery which we had 
passed, we determined that, as a last 
resort, we would spend the rest of the 
night there. We used the last resort. 

At about three o'clock in the morning 
we found it necessary to leave the vi- 
cinity of our friendly haven to reach 
drier territory because of the fine rain 
that had started to fall. We passed out 
through the cemetery gate and into the 
arms of officers in a patrol car. We were 
soon challenged and were asked our 
names, ages, homes, and reasons for be- 
ing there. Satisfying their curiosity, 
we were told to go to the Red Cross base 
and get a cup of coffee. We informed 
them haughtily that we had money, but 
asked if they would be so kind as to 
give us a pass through the lines in order 
that we might take photographs. They 
were pleasant enough about it and soon 
we were oil our way in the direction of 
the friendly lights of a hot-dog stand. 
We managed to consume an hour over 
two cups of coffee and hamburgers. 

Upon our departure we managed to 
spend the remaining hours before day- 
light answering the questions of patro 1 
officers and flashing our pass. Morn- 
ing broke cold and bleak and dashed our 
hoped of ever getting pictures. But 
with determination we entered the area 
and, to our amazement, found wooden 
street blocks floating on the surface of 
the water, dories and motorboats drawn 
up in the streets, garbage and refuse 



THE PILGRIM 



39 



on the sidewalks, and all manner of 
household goods floating about on the 
surface. Sodden people stood discon- 
solate, looking to see whether their 
houses were floating as yet. One man 
shoved off in a canoe and paddled out 
to his home. Unlocking the door, he 
drifted inside to the stairs and went up 
to inspect the interior. Exhibiting hu- 
mor, he went over to the radiator and 
felt of it. 

"Hmm," he said, "I wonder what's 
wrong with the furnace. The radiators 
are stone cold." 

Leaving that street, we went to an- 
other and found the rain slowly wash- 
ing away the blood of two young men 
who had been shot that night for loot- 
ing. A small group of people had gath- 
ered. 

What had once been streets was only 
water, marked by No Parking signs and 
trees. Climbing a hill, we could over- 
look the whole area. It was three miles 
across to the other side, and innumer- 
able houses, garages, trees, and debris 
floated along off to one side of the Con- 
necticut River. The real position of the 
river could be defined by the humping 
up of one section of the area about two 
feet above the rest. Tops of trees looked 
like bushes sticking out of the water. 
We could see no bridges, but we learned 
that, shortly after we left the place, a 
great covered bridge, the last crossing 
of the river at the section, had floated 
placidly by. 

The night we arrived the water had 
fallen two feet, but now the increasing 
rain had caused it to rise again and, 
before we left, it had gained all it had 
lost. Also, because of the increase in 
looting, the guard was increased and 
it became more difficult than ever to 
get about under the eyes of the sleepy, 
surly guardsmen and marines. 

Disgusted at our inability to take pic- 
tures of the amazing work of nature, 
we decided to leave the city. Feeling 
sympathetic with the sufferers and 
heartsore at the loss of such valuable 
property, we slowly tramped out of the 
city and started to thumb for home. 

Many were the strange scenes that 
we witnessed. In many places there 
were signs indicating that milk and 
bread had just arrived and were ready 
to be sold. Flood sufferers were walk- 
ing about in clothes sometimes too large 
for them and as often too small. Thene 
were youthful National Guardsmen ap- 
proaching large groups of men and, 
with chest out and chin high, holding 



a rifle and saying, "Move along, you 
guys. You're not supposed to stand in 
one place." 

According to the sages it was the 
worst flood in sixty years, so we don't 
believe we did much wrong in using two 
days of our valuable ( ?) time to see 
something that might not happen again 
in sixty years. 

But we were glad to leave that pain- 
ridden city because we did not get dry 
again until we reached the friendly city 
of Boston. 

It's good to have a dry, warm home. 
George Nickerson '36 



SPRING IN ENGLAND 

ENGLAND in the spring! The fra- 
grant odor of beautiful primroses 
and bluebells mingled with the fresh 
woodland scent. A cloudless, blue sky 
smiled gaily down on one of nature's 
perfect days. Seeming actually to be 
smiling with the day, deer peeped from 
behind the trees that lined the drive- 
way. The trees with their newly- 
awakening buds fluttered gently in the 
slight breeze, and rabbits scampered 
across the drive. 

This was the scene we saw as we mo- 
tored up the winding, tree-arched road- 
day which led to the manor. As we 
turned a corner, the sun fell, gleaming, 
on a typical English house. High tur- 
rets rose from behind low ells and hid- 
den nooks. The massive stateliness was 
somewhat overshadowed by a certain 
homelike quality. Stretching to the sides 
were spacious lawns, with laughing, 
talking people sitting at ease on the 
lounging chairs or flung carelessly on 
the grass. 

While we stood watching this pleas- 
ant scene, a tall, fair-haired man de- 
tached himself from a group of people 
and came forward with outstretched 
hands. He was pure Anglo-Saxon ; 
flaxen-haired, blue-eyed: the perfect 
English squire. Alert, courteous, and 
generous, he made us feel as if every- 
thing he had were ours, and yet we 
knew that he was not easily fooled. 

Entering the house, we saw a wide 
hallway with portraits lining its dark 
walls ; portraits of ancestors to be proud 
of — and otherwise. The rooms were all 
lofty and high-ceilinged. But they all 
looked comfortable and slightly shabby, 
as if they had been lived in, and were 
not just to be looked at. 

This was the perfect setting for a 
perfect week-end. 

Marion Treglown '39 



40 



THE PILGRIM 



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THE HOUSE OF MEMORIES | 

It was an old and rambling home, 

A place where spiders loved to roam, 

The cobwebs spread like fairy veils, ;; 

And seemed to hold mysterious tales. 

To look at it, one would not know 
That people dwelt here long ago: 
Young boys and girls who played and sang 
While walls and rafters loudly rang. 

The ladies, graceful, shy, and fair, 
Were dressed with elegance and care, 
With lovely hair piled row on row, 
And pretty curls that set below. 

There's nothing left but memories now, | 

So, rambling house, just take your bow, 

And thankful be that you possess 

Memories gay and old and blessed. § 

Harriet Longhi '39 § 



SONG OF THE SEASONS 



On winter days 
The snow is white, 
The sky is dark, 
The cold winds bite. 

On a spring day 
The sky is blue, 
The ground is wet, 
Buds burst anew. 

'Neath summer skies 
The grass is green, 
And the gay brooks 
Clear mirrors seem. 

The leaves are brown, 
The sky is gray, 
The winds blow free 
On an autumn day. 



FIRST LOVE 



• 3ti 



Burton A. Burgess '39 



He walks around, head in the air, 
While dreaming of a lady fair: 
Her golden curls in a huge pink bow 
Dance 'fore his eyes in a bright halo: 
Her sparkling eyes are like twinkling stars, 
For in his dreamy state nothing mars 
Her beauty, though she's only three. 
And he with springing steps so free 
Struts to the village candy store 
To buy some sweets to leave at her door. 
He never loved a playmate more, — 
Though she is three, and he is four. 

Anne Beaman '39 



| J 'lo Ii iJ | 

i CJOTJJ J I % 

1 v/ ) j ,THE FAIRIES' AEROPLANES 

I The fairies, too, have aeroplanes § 

| To carry them about, • = 

| That soar and swoop and dart and dip, 

= And circle in and out. = 

| The fairies' aeroplanes are safe 

5 And never can capsize: | 

| How beautiful they are and gay, — 
Because they're butterflies! 

^ By Laura MacLean '39 | 



FIESTA 

Red skirts swirling, 
Gay scarfs twirling, 
Dusky shapes whirling 
To the strum of guitars. 

Voices singing, 
Lanterns swinging, 
Castanets ringing 
'Neath the twinkling stars. 

Soft breeze blowing, 
Moonlight flowing, 
Bright torches glowing 
Through the old willow trees. 

Lovers romancing, 
Dark eyes glancing, 
Graceful forms dancing 
By the glistening seas. 

Betty Coleman '39 



NIGHT 

Silver moon 

shining bright, 
Jet black sky 

no clouds in sight, 
Warm, soft wind 

comes drifting by, 
Shining stars 

that prick the sky, 
Deep quiet 

as soft as snow, 
All asleep 

in the world below, 
Hooting owl 

her search for prey, 
Scurrying feet 

haste from her way! 

Constance Kellen '39 



"cjiiii iiiNimiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiciimiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiM 



THE PILGRIM 



41 



THE IRONY OF FATE 

MR. STAMWYCK, a bachelor in the 
middle thirties, loved the solitude of 
country life. Immigrating to America in 
1837, he built himself a small farm in 
the fertile valley of the Pemigewasset 
River in New Hampshire. Stamwyck 
was a short, plump man boasting a 
jolly, red face, bushy, walnut hair and 
mustache, and a pair of rough, brown, 
toil-hardened hands. He wore a bat- 
tered, old, straw hat, faded blue shirt 
and overalls, and a pair of sturdy shoes. 
His habits being few and simple, he led 
an easy contented life, living on what 
he raised and having very little com- 
munication with the outside world. 

The only thing that broke the tran- 
quillity of Mr. Stamwyck's happy life 
was the unreasoning fear that he had 
of all snakes, however small or harm- 
less they might be. 

One evening he was awakened by a 
low, distant, rumbling sound. Sitting 
up in bed, he gazed around, but being 
still dazed by the effects of a few hours 
sleep, he thought the noise was thunder, 
rolled over upon his other side, and 
promptly went to sleep. 

Again he awoke, but this time with 
a start, to find that his house was shak- 
ing and that the rumbling sound had 
increased in volume to an ominous roar. 
Placing an old bathrobe over his shoul- 
ders and sliding his bare feet into a 
pair of worn slippers, he sauntered over 
to a window which overlooked the river. 
He stopped short, gasped in amazement, 
took two steps backwards, closed his 
eyes, looked again, and then shook him- 
self to make sure he was not dreaming. 
It was true! The waters of the river 
had overflowed its banks, and the once 
peaceful Pemigewasset had been trans- 
formed into a raging, roaring demon 
which was at this moment rapidly 
approaching his front doorstep. Ex- 
cited and bewildered, he dressed, raced 
out into the night to his barns, freed 
his stock and poultry, then raced back 
again into the house. 

The rising flood waters had by this 
time almost reached the top of the 
kitchen stove. Therefore he was forced 
upstairs. In his excitement Stamwyck 

Continued on Page 43 



THE MODERN GIRL 

(With apologies to John Greenleaf Whittier) 



Fie upon thee modern girl, 

With thy "permanented" curl, 
Flapping trousers, mannish shirts, 

(Girls today care not for skirts.) 
With thy red lips, reddened more 

From thy lipstick's ruddy store: 
Two thin lines upon thy face 

Of each eyebrow show a trace. 
Princess, thou dost have thy way — 

No one ever says thee nay. 

Oh, for girls of olden days 

With their sweet and gentle ways! 
Love for parents, home, and schools, 

Never thought of breaking, rules. 
Girlish faces, sweet, and fair, 

Modest clothes and natural hair. 
Modest manners, npthing "wise," 

Gentle tones and downcast eyes. 
Olden girls all hearts have won, 

Fie upon thee, modern one. 



Margery Croft '36 




HILL FEVER 



I must go up to my hill again, 
Where the fleecy clouds roll by; 

And all I ask is a strong wind, 
To blow my kite on high. 

And Patch, my dog, with his wet, red tongue 
And his comical, speckled face 

Will climb with me to the hill-top 
And gaze with me into space. 

This dog of mine, which is spotted brown, 

Will with me lie content: 
For here our troubles all vanish soon, 

And joys are not soon spent. 

I love the hills, which are rich and green, 
And the blue sky necked with white, 

I love my dog — that is ever true, 
As o'er me sails my kite. 

Carol Handy 



AN IMPENDING BATTLE 

The ship glides forward 

Unhesitatingly, 

Straight toward the foe. 

The captain many times 

Has met this enemy — and won; 

Yet, on the bridge, 

His brow is anxious. 

Toward the ship it comes, 

With cold indifference. 

Dauntless, the damp, white folds 

Enshoud the ship — 

The Battle is on! 

The ship has everything to lose, 

The fog — nothing. 

Burnham Young '36 



42 



THE PILGRIM 




GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

First Row: A. Dutton, I. Albertini, A. Riley, E. Lee, R. Wood, A. Dries, B. Boudrot. 
Second Roio: M. Tracey, J. Pearson, A. Martinelli, D. Ziegengeist, T. Cook, 

J. Broadbent. 
Third Row: B. Bernier, A. Leland, C. Handy, S. Clark, P. Roberts, E. Ryan. 
Fourth Row: Dr. Davis, H. Belcher, A. Lewis, R. Butts, M. Wright, R. Sherman. 




BOYS' GLEE CLUB 



First Row: C. Moores, V. Kirkey, W. Clarke, W. Cohen, R. Holmes, W. Moores. 
Second Row: R. Cleveland, Dr. Davis, S. Addyman, E. Wright, D. Tubbs, W. 
Tedeschi. 



THE PILGRIM 



43 



Continued from Page 41 

rummaged here and there, picking up 
and then dropping articles which he 
might save. By this time the water 
was swiftly climbing the stairway. 

Seizing a sheet, he filled it with 
clothing and tried to tie its ends to- 
gether. But the flimsy material tore 
and its contents splashed into the ever- 
rising, swirling waters. 

The river had climbed to the second 
story windows. 

Finally and reluctantly abandoning 
his home, Stamwyck mounted a window- 
sill and dived out into the maddened 
waters. Suddenly, while swimming, a 
cold, clammy sweat broke out on his 
forehead and a chill raced up and down 
his spinal column. The fear of snakes 
overtook him at this critical moment. 
He shuddered and cringed with every 
stroke as he imagined that he felt a 
cold, wet body slipping through his 
thrashing legs. Frantically he headed 
for a hill, the top of which reached 
above the flood waters a little way 
ahead of him. 

Then it happened ! There it was ! A 
black, shiny, hideous snake with wicked, 
bobbing head darted toward him. Like 
a man who has become paralyzed, he 
became numb, his limbs ceased to func- 
tion, and he started to sink. Then the 
the poor man, realizing where he was, 
frantically struck out anew. Try as 
he could, he was not able to outdo that 
oncoming, deadly menace behind him, 
for it gradually came closer and closer. 
At last what self-control he possessed 
gave way. Madly he screeched, dived, 
and tried to dodge, but the sleek snake 
drew nearer to him. Stamwyck's eyes 
bulged and rolled in terror. The snake 
was now slipping over his legs and ap- 
proaching the back of his neck. 

This was more than he could endure. 
With fear paralyzing his limbs he 
ceased to swim. He gasped, the world 
turned black before his eyes, and then 
the thing he most feared happened. 
The snake touched his neck, slithered 
down the collar of his loose shirt, and 
he knew no more. 

Later he was found by a rescue party, 
dead. Before they covered him with a 
blanket, they pulled from the back of 
his neck a crooked, shiny stick, which 
bore a striking resemblance to a black 
snake. 

Leo Roberge 



THE GOOD OLD DAYS 

WE often hear people wishing for 
the return of the good old days. 

An interesting document was brought 
to light during the celebration of the 
eightieth anniversary of the Carson, 
Prarie, Scott and Company store in 
Chicago. 

Someone in the organization had pre- 
served the rules for employees of its 
first store which read as follows : 

"Store must be open from 6 A. M. to 
9 P. M. the year round. 

"Store must be swept; counters, base 
shelves and showcases dusted. Lamps 
trimmed, filled, and chimneys cleaned; 
pens made ; doors and windows opened ; 
a pail of water, also a bucket of coal 
brought in before breakfast (if there is 
time to do so) and attend to customers 
who call. 

"Store must not be opened on the 
Sabbath unless necessary, and then only 
for a few minutes. 

"The employee who is in the habit of 
smoking Spanish cigars, being shaved 
at the barber's, going to dances and 
other places of amusement, will surely 
give his employer reason to be sus- 
picious of his integrity and honesty. 

"Each employee must not pay less 
than §5 per year to the church and must 
attend Sunday School regularly. 

"Men employees are given one eve- 
ning a week for courting, and two if 
they go to prayer meeting. 

"After fourteen hours of work in the 
store, the leisure time should be spent 
mostly in reading." 

Now who was it we heard sighing 
for "the good old days?" 

Eleanor Brewer '37 



MARY 

Mary, Mother Mary, when Jesus was a boy, 
Did He ever beg you, tearfully, to mend a broken 

toy? 
And in spite of all your warnings, did He not 

sometimes forget 
And, pitying, bring home with Him some dirty 

little pet? 
And when He lingered at your knee, O Mary, did 

you tell 
Him stories of His people when the misty twi- 
light fell? 
And, tireless, by His sickbed, did you sit the 

night hours through, 
Afraid lest some Almighty Power would take 

your Boy from you? 
And sometimes, Mary, did you feel a strange, 

disturbing loss, 
And suddenly look up to see the shadow of a 

cross? 

Mary Bodell '37 



44 



THE PILGRIM 




FORglGR 
ANGUAGES 



Connaissex-vous Vos 
Camarades? 

Je vais vous decrire une de nos cam- 
arades qui est aussi dans notre classe 
de francais. Elle a les yeux et les 
cheveux bruns. Elle est d'une taille 
moyenne et un peu grosse. Souvent elle 
porte des robes vertes. Elle parle bien 
le francais, mais sa voix est tres douce, 
comme nous remarquons dans toutes 
nos autres classes. Recemment elle a 
recu une licence pour conduire un auto, 
et quelques fois elle vient a l'ecole dans 
son auto. Elle chante bien, et l'annee 
passee elle a eu un role dans l'operette 
"Pinafore." 

Maintenant je pense que je vous ai 
dit assez d'elle afin que vous puissiez 
deviner qui elle est. La connaissez- 
vous ? 



Qui est un des garcons les plus popu- 
lates de notre ecole superieure? Le 
garcon de qui nous parlons est un eleve 
de la quatrieme annee et il sortira de 
cette ecole en juin. 

II joue bien au football et aussi il est 
garde dans 1'equippe de basketball. 
L'annee passee il etait le tresorier de 
la classe de 1936. II y a une chose 
en particulier par laquelle nous pouvons 
le reconnaitre. C'est son cure-dent qu'il 
a entre ses dents presque toujours. 
Aussi a-t-il danse notre cirque comme un 
petit garcon hollaindais. 

Le connaissez-vous ? 




Pour Rire 

UNE HISTOIRE TRISTE 

Ceci s'est passe dans une classe d'his- 
toine de la troisieme annee de l'ecole 
superieure. 

Le sujet du jour etait "l'ltalie" — son 
commerce, ses gens, ses coutumes, et 
cetera. 

II y avait beaucoup d'eleves dans la 
classe dont les parents etaient venus 
aux Etats-Unis de l'ltalie. Us parlaient 
des choses que leurs parents leur avai- 
ent dites de l'ltalie. 

Un garcon anime qui parlait couram- 
ment a dit : Ma mere et mon pere travil- 
laient dur dans les champs de macaroni 
en Italie — 

Le professeur, tout surpris d'entendre 
ceci, l'a interrompu, et d'une maniere 
unn peu sarcastique a dit: Mais, mon 
ami, ou croyez-vous que le macaroni 
croisse? 

Le gargon, indigne, a repondu : Mais 
sur les "macaroniers," bien entendu ! 



Mme. Swift (en discutant avec la 
classe l'histoire du Virginian) : Qu'est- 
ce que c'est qu'un barbecue? 

M. B.: C'est le pole qu'on trouve 
pres du magasin d'un barbier. 



Cette annee le meme M. B- 



— dit 

en parlant a la classe de ses poules : Ce 
sont les faQons dont on peut recon- 
naitre une poule qui pondra beaucoup 
d'oeufs. II a une crete tres rouge, il 
a de grands os, bien formes, et il a un 
oeil brillant. 



THE PILGRIM 



45 



LA BONNE PRONONCIATION 

Un jour, quand nous sommes entres 
dans la classe de francais, notre pro- 
fesseur, nous a demande d'ecrire une 
composition francaise pour notre legon. 
Elle a dit: 

— Je vous permettrai d'ecrire un 
journal pendant une semaine, mais si 
quelques-uns veulent, et s'ils peuvent le 
faire, je leur permettrai d'ecrire un 
poeme. 

Le jour qu'elle a designe la classe lui 
a rendu leurs compositions, dans les- 
quelles il y avait quelques poemes. 

Le professeur les a corrigees et les a 
rendues aux eleves. Une fille, qui avait 
ecrit un poeme, a remarque qu'elle a 
re§u C minus. Elle etait tres etonnee, 
et elle a remarque que sur la papier 
etait ecrit a l'encre rouge — Ceci ne 
rime pas. 

— Mais, clit la fille, il rime, quand je 
le prononce. 



II y a dans cette ecole un gargon qui 
n'est pas tres intelligent. II demeure 
a North Plymouth, et presque chaque 
jour il tache d'avoir une promenade en 
voiture. L'autre jour un homme, qui 
avait le mot Pennsylvania sur ses 
licences de voiture, lui a donne une 
promenade a North Plymouth. Le gar- 
con a cause avec le bon homme et lui a 
demande d'ou il est venu? L'homme lui 
a dit: 

— Je viens de Philadelphia. 

— Et alors, pourquoi avez-vous des 
licences qui disent Pennsylvania? a 
repondu le garcon embrouille. 



Le professeur expliquait le temps 
des verbes. II a tourne a un garcon et 
a demande: 

— Quel est le temps passe du verbe 
marier? 

Le gargon a repondu tres vite : 

— Divorce ! 



LA DERNIERE CLASSE 

OUAND vous lisez le titre de cette com- 
position, je crois que vous penserez 
peut-etre a l'histoire, "La Derniere 
Classe" par Daudet. Cette histoire de 
Daudet est tres triste mais celle que je 
vous raconterai n'est pas triste. En 
parlant de la "Derniere Classe," je veux 
dire notre classe qui sortira de cette 
ecole le dix-huit juin, mil neuf cent 
trente-six. 

Au "Junior High School," l'ecole dans 
laquelle nous sommes entres avant 



d'entrer dans l'ecole superieure, nous 
etions la derniere classe d'avoir Mile. 
Katherine O'Brien comme directrice. 
Elle etait aimee par toutes les classes 
qui l'ont connue. 

En mil neuf cent trente-deux cette 
grande dame s'est retiree du service 
publique. C'etait la raeme annee que 
notre classe a quitte "Junior High 
School." Nous sommes tres fiers d'avoir 
connu si bien Mile. O'Brien et d'avoir 
ete sous sa direction. 

II est possible que vous vous rappel- 
liez que notre classe a recu les derniers 
deplomes de "Junior High School." 
Ces deplomes etaient presentes a la con- 
clusion de la piece "La Vie de George 
Washington" dans "Memorial Hall." 

Voila deux annees bien passees! 

A l'ecole superieure, notre classe a 
fait tres bien dans ses etudes. Toutes 
les choses qu'elle a entreprises, telles 
que des danses, ont reussi. 

L'annee prochaine, les classe qui nous 
suivent, entreront dans la nouvelle 
ecole. Cela nous nous fera la derniere 
classe qui sortira de ce batiment, et 
aussi la plus grande parce qu'il y a plus 
de cent cinquante eleves. 

La vie de la classe de trente-six a 
l'ecole superieure a ete tres heureuse 
puisque les eleves ont coopere en tout. 

Ainsi n'est-il pas juste que notre 
classe soit appellee "La Derniere 
Classe." 

par Vincent Baietti '36 



JANET'S ADVANCED STUDIES 

(Taken from Edgar Guest) 

Tempus erat she thought me very wise, 

Sed iam so far est she in school, 
She looks at me contristatis eyes 

As adoratio starts to cool. 
She's needing auxilium et vertit ad me 

Exspectat id upon the spot, 
Et ego confiteor shamefacedly 

What French ego scivi, I've iam forgot. 

Nunc Caesaris cum eius Gallicis Wars 

Piget earn as olim he fretted me — 
'Tis mirum what woes he vixit to cause, 

As et juvenes et veteres agree 
Mecum on the toro ea sedet 

Supra illos commentaries bent, 
Et ego sum baffled et admit 

I can't dicere nunc what Caesar meant. 

Aliquando the twinkles in her eyes 

I'm certus conditam laetitiam display 
As ego, qui olim have seemed so wise 

Meam totam ignorationem display. 
Her mater in her placido way 

Quoque ridet my plight a lot. 
She nictat Janet quando I say: 

"Ego scivi id olim, sed I've forgot!" 

Annie Paoli '37 



46 



THE PILGRIM 



PILGRIM MATER 

HODIE Pilgrim Mater trans frigidos, 
inimicos fluctus tacite tuetur. For- 
tasse etiam de domu in Anglia relicta 
somnit. Fortasse miratur qui multi 
viatores, qui aestate circum earn fre- 
quentent, sint. 

Scintillans aqua supra eius caput in 
marmoream lacunam prope eius pedes 
decidit. Marmorea lacuna est plena 
aquae aestate et gratus conspectus lasso 
viatori est. Alta saepes earn circum- 
sistit, velutsi ab clamoso, propinq,uo 
itinere earn defendat. Marmoreum sub- 
sellium lasso viatori quietem praebet, et 
humus circum matrem lapillis operitur. 

Hieme mater suis mentibus relinqui- 
tur sed aestas admirantes viatores, ut 
eius simplicitatem tueantur, fert. 

Margaret Donovan '36 



PLYMOUTHIUM SAXUM 

SAXUM, in quo Peregrinatores primum 
ambulaverunt, et quod Plymouthium 
clarum fecit, ad marginem aquae sub 
conopeum album, amplum quiescit. Id 
est canum saxum et numeros 1620 in eo 
insculptos habet. Amplam rimam per 
medium etiam habet. 

Antiquitus saxum in crepidine aquae 
stabat sed post numerum annorum ad 
Pilgrimum Atrium sublatum est et pro 
eo aedificio collocatum est. Postea ad 
portum relatum est. 

Aestate multi cives ut id saxum 
videant, veniunt. Multi, quod tarn par- 
vum saxum vident, frustrantur. 

Virginia Wood '36 



HYMNS ODI 

Adapted from "Hymns of Hate" by E. P. Adams 

Tamen velim to scourge with flails 
Puellas quae pingunt their finger nails, 
Sed laete would I murder those 
Quae pingunt suas decern unbeauteous toes. 

Ego hoc castigo the crook 

Qui borrows nor revertit my book; 

Sed ad Gehennam eum I consign 

Qui dicit, "Reverte ilium book of mine." 

Amor, quam te fastidio when reviewing 
Singula quae you have been doing! 
Neque mihi dantem a chance to say 
Mordaces res I've done all day. 

Oh femina, in your hours of care, 

Cur non potes facere the roast beef rare? 

Et femina, in your hours of fun, 

Cur non curas the bacon be well done? 

Ethel Shwom '37 



THE INFUENCE OF THE POET 
VIRGIL 

rpHE world to-day little realizes how 

much it woes to the classic literature 
of the old Roman poets: Horace and 
Virgil. It is particularly interesting to 
note what sayings have been taken 
from Virgil. 

Aside from sayings, his meter, the 
dactylic hexameter, was used by Long- 
fellow in his epic poem "Evangeline." 
Milton in his poem "Paradise Lost" used 
much the same descriptions and many of 
the incidents. Dryden, Tennyson, and 
Chaucer in their turn have all copied 
Virgil. Dante, when speaking of his 
"Divine Comedy," freely admits that 
Virgil was his guide in picturing the 
underworld. 

During the second century, it was the 
custom to consult Virgil as an oracle in 
times of great stress. This was done 
by opening the Aeneid to any part and 
considering the first line seen by the eye 
to be a prophecy. Such prophecies were 
known as the Sortes Virgilianae. 

No other early author has been con- 
sulted and quoted so much as Virgil. 
Sayings, some of them now considered 
proverbs, are constantly being found in 
the translation of the Aeneid. The pur- 
port of these vary from: "Who can 
deceive a lover?" to that motto of so 
many high school classes, "They are able 
who seem to be able." From his pen 
come also these sayings : "All's fair in 
love and war." "Woman — always 
fickle," and "Fear betrays weak minds." 
Another, less common, is connected with 
the Trojan horse : "Don't believe in the 
horse. I fear the Greeks even bearing 
gifts." 

And lastly, many puns have been 
based on that famous first line of the 
Aeneid: "Arma virumque cano," such 
as, "I cry for arms and a man" rather 
than "I sing of war and a hero." 

Elizabeth Belcher '36 



Auntie — Do you ever play with bad 
little boys? 

Willy — Yes, auntie. 

Auntie — Why, Willy ! Why don't you 
play with good little boys? 

Willy — Their mothers won't let me. 
— American Boy 



THE PILGRIM 



47 



WE COULDN'T COLLECT A PRICE 

FOR OUR SILENCE — SO 

WE SPEAK! 

Personals : 

What's the attraction in the Class of 
'34, Janet, Lucy, Barbara? 

Why does C. G. rate the last dance on 
the program, Thelma? 

It seems that Stevadores Susie, and 
Susadores Steve. 

Gildo, has Ella overcome your bash- 
fulness? 

Alba has a "to be or not to be" : Eddie 
or Bobby. 

We hope Helen will find Germany 
worthwhile. 

Now, Edna, Pop doesn't like to wait. 

And we thought Dot P. was bashful, 
mee-o-my ! 

Very sorry that the fighting in the 
Alumni Game just spoiled your evening, 
Priscilla. 
Observations : 

Dot Roger's escort on a dark Friday 
night. (We can see Steve still blush- 
ing.) 

Stoo bad Gumma doesn't graduate, 
eh, Kay? 

You ought to know Alvin by now, 
Babe, especially after cooking him a 
dinner. 

Dot V. (these Dots)— It's tough to 
make Bob walk to Braunecker's Farm. 
How's about a compromise? 

Can Pauline tame Tony? (The 
Duchess couldn't.) 

Steggy appeals to us too, Warren. 

Watch out for the Coast Guards, 
Eddie. 

Pouvez-vous parler le frangais main- 
tenant, George? 

Tough to lose Madelaine, Willy. 

When in doubt consult Webster, 
(Moores). 

The birds go south, but not Proffetti. 

Why don't you speak for yourself, 
Luigi? 

Hully, why does Janet come to school 
so early? 

The only thing missing, Cap, is the li- 
cense. 

Alvin, make up your mind — Summer 
Street or Crescent Street, 

Do you think you can manage her, 
Coke? 

You must have it bad to steal his pic- 
ture, Connie. 

Jelly, we're surprised; falling asleep 
between two girls on a 129 mile auto 
trip! 



Are we good? We've even the edi- 
tor-in-chief worried. 

By the way, what was the reason for 
coloring in February 19th? (Ask B. M. 
C.) 

Tootsie, we wanna know, what hap- 
pened behind Weymouth High School 
on the night of January 14th? 

The seniors ought to have a meeting 
every week. Every time the treasurer's 
report is read, we make fifty dollars. 

There's a basketball player we used 
to call "Hearts and Flowers," but we 
like "Flutter" better. 

We noticed during the coasting sea- 
son that teachers enjoy this sport also. 

By Luigi & Vincenzo 
The Irish "G-Men" 



SAND DUNE GRASS 



The grasses that grow on the sand of the dunes 
Defiantly standing are hardy as knaves, 

Heads bowing low they whistle weird tunes 
In the face of the wind and the spray of the 
waves. 

The grasses are strong till the fog chills the 
night; 
For in his gray face what is bravery worth? 
They struggle and quail before his might, 
Then in utter subjection they bend to the 
earth. 

George W. Wood '36 



CONTENTMENT 



The sea slipped up to the sand and said, 

"O sand, how quiet you lie! 

You are baked by the sun the whole day 

through, 
While only the wind sweeps by. 
Now I am in motion from dawn 'til dusk; 
And the fish in my green halls play; 
And mermen and maidens with tresses of 

gold 
Sing while I echo their laughter gay." 
The sand smiled serenely, and said to the 

sea, 
"O sea, you're entirely wrong; 
Though here I must lie in the warm sun- 
shine 
Without even an echo of song, 
I watch the ships with their shimmering 

sails 
And the gulls with their downy breasts; 
All the night long by the moon's silver 

light 
I can lie here and dream and rest: 
While you must be rushing from shore to 

shore, 
I'm sheltered and shaded by God's own 

trees; 
The children play here to their heart's 

content; 
I'd rather be sand than a thousand seas!" 

P. Roberts '36 



48 



THE PILGRIM 




HOLD THAT LINE! 

IN early September a large, enthusi- 
astic squad of football candidates 
greeted the new coaches, Mr. Henry 
Knowlton, a graduate of Springfield 
College, and Mr. Mario Romano, a 
graduate of Boston College. After a 
few weeks of preliminary training, the 
team opened its season with a victory 
over Kingston. 

However, the team did not make a 
very impressive record, for it won only 
two games, tied one, and lost six, but 
the majority of the defeats were due 
to the failure to convert the points after 
touchdowns. Two games were lost by 
one point and two others by two points. 
The Weymouth game was lost on the 
field, but was later won on a forfeit as 
one of Weymouth's players was over 
the age limit. But we are counting this 
game as a loss — not a win. The high- 
lights of the season were the Rockland 
and Whitman games. 

In the Rockland game, played at 
Rockland, the team's most sensational 
play was made. Tony "Jumbo" Govoni, 
star backfield man, received a punt, 
wove back and forth through the entire 
Rockland team, and with a touchdown 
in sight, stumbled exhausted. Then at 
the last moment he heaved a lateral 
pass to a team-mate who ran unmolest- 
ed for a touchdown. 

This year Whitman had an unde- 
feated season, but its record was 
smirched by a tie game with Plymouth. 
Whitman came to Plymouth an over- 
whelming favorite, but the home town 
lads, undaunted by their opponents' 
impressive record, played sensational 
football to score first and add the extra 
point after the touchdown to go into 
the lead seven to nothing. Whitman 
fought back grimly and, with only 
seconds of the first half remaining, 
scored a touchdown on a fluke pass 
which was partially blocked, then 
added the extra point to tie the score. 
The game finally ended in a seven to 
seven tie. 

The season ended at Weymouth and 
after the game Louis Poluzzi, who had 
acted as captain in some of the games, 



was elected honorary captain of the 
season just completed. 

After the football togs were put 
away, the team was tendered a ban- 
quet held at the Church of the Pilgrim- 
age. The dinner was served by high 
school girls under the supervision of 
Miss McNerny. Speeches were delivered 
by Mr. Knowlton, Mr. Romano, Mr. 
Handy, Mr. Shipman, Mr. Bagnall, and 
Mr. Haskell. The captain, Louis Poluz- 
zi, on behalf of the team, then presented 
Mr. Knowlton and Mr. Romano with 
small gold footballs, whereupon Telio 
Giammarco was unanimously elected 
football captain of 1936. 

The prospects for next year are 
fairly bright, for the following boys 
are returning: Captain Telio Giam- 
marco, "Red" Reggini, Ed. Wright, Bev. 
James, Carbone, Barbieri, Tassanari, 
Leonardi, Allen, G. Fratus, Montimaggi, 
and probably "Jumbo" Govoni. There 
are also many promising prospects 
from the freshmen ranks. 



FOOTBALL FIFTY YEARS AGO 

T^OOTBALL originated in a rather un- 
-T usual way at Plymouth High School 
about fifty years ago. One student ob- 
tained a book of rules and, after reading 
it, the other fellows decided to organize 
a team. With this rule book as a coach, 
the boys all contributed a little money, 
bought a ball, and began to practice on 
Lincoln Street Field. 

The equipment was very different 
from .that used to-day, for the players 
had no padded uniforms to protect 
them. A "duck-skin" suit was a very 
popular article of equipment. This suit 
was made of oil skin which was very 
slippery; therefore it was very difficult 
for the opponents to tackle the ball- 
carrier. Only one player had cleats on 
his shoes ; the rest used any shoes they 
owned. Although the equipment afford- 
ed little protection to the players, there 
were few injuries. The school bought 
no equipment for the team, nor did it 
aid it in any way. 

The team played such schools as 
Powder Point, Kingston, and Bridge- 
Continued on Page 50 



THE PILGRIM 



49 




BASKETBALL SQUAD 

First Row: B. James, M. Garuti, L. Poluzzi, A. Whiting, H. Raymond, R. Proffetti, 

T. Giammarco. 
Second Row: B. Petit, M. Petit, H. Smith, L. Goodwin. G. Ferazzi, V. Baietti. 
Third Row: Coach Ingraham, John Ryan, E. Leonardi, A. Medeiros, M. Reggini, 

Coach Knowlton. 






50 



THE PILGRIM 



Continued from Page 48 
water Normal. These games were con- 
sidered a long trip for the team as its 
means of transportation were limited. 
In those days the team traveled by horse 
and wagon, for the automobile had not 
been invented. The roads were made of 
gravel, and it took the team two or three 
hours to reach Powder Point. 

The home games were played at 
Goddards Field, which was situated on 
Holmes Terrace. No admission was 
charged to about two hundred specta- 
tors who attended the games. Often one 
of the players had to work on the day 
of the game and the team would scour 
the town looking for someone to play in 
his place. 

The field was uneven and not free 
from stones, which made the running 
hard and bruised the players consider- 
ably. Some of the players at that time 
were "Charlie" Gooding, John Church- 
ill, "Fred" Goddard, "Gippy" Sander- 
son, and "Skip" Morton. 

The playing field was the same size as 
it is to-day and was marked off in the 
same manner. The number of players 
used was also the same as to-day. The 
boys usually did not play the same 
position throughout the season. 



until that stage of the game. 

The team was handled in a fine man- 
ner by Coaches Ingraham and Knowlton. 
They were, naturally, somewhat handi- 
capped by unfamiliarity with the ability 
of each player. 

The highlight of the season was the 
fine showing made by the team at the 
South Shore Tournament held at the 
Brockton Y. M. C. A. There they regis- 
tered an overwhelming victory over 
Stetson High of Randolph in the first 
round of play. In the second round the 
team faced the strong Oliver Ames 
High School of North Easton which 
had scored a victory over Plymouth 
during the regular playing season, 
and which was considered the favorite 
to w;n the tournament. After a hard- 
fought contest, Plymouth gained a 25 to 
23 victory to enter the semi-finals. It 
was here the team met its Waterloo 
when it was defeated by Weymouth 
High 50 to 22. 

The players lost by graduation are 
Captain Alton Whiting, Harold Ray- 
mond, Mario Garuti, Louis Poluzzi, 
Robert Proffetti, and Lawrence Good- 
win. Those players returning are Ga- 
briel Ferazzi, Telio Giammarco, Nicholas 
Carbone, Howard Smith, Beverly James, 




THE PILGRIM 



51 




GIRLS' HOCKEY TEAM 
First Row: E. Shreiber, D. Hall, A. Hall, E. Nickerson, M. Brigida. 
Second Roio: A. Wood, M. Donovan, J. Clark, C. Drew, L. Mayo, E. Vaughn. 
Third Roiv: A. Shreiber, E. Belcher, P. Johnson, K. Christie, P. Lovell, M. Lahey, 

M. Tracey. 
Fourth Row: Mrs. Garvin, C. Handy, M. Weild, J. Whitney, J. Hall, E. Lee, 

E. Payson, J. Pearson. 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 
First Row: N. Caldera, J. Clark, A. Martinelli, A. Kail, C. Drew, L. Mayo. 
Second Row: P. Johnson, E. Shreiber, M. Donovan, K. Christie, P. Lovell, E. 

Vaughn, E. Nickerson. 
Third Row: L. Nicoli, A. Shreiber, M. Weild, E. Lee, D. Hall, J. Perrault, M. 

Lahey, L. Brewster, M. Tracey. 
Fourth Row: Mrs. Garvin, A. Wood, J. Whiting, E. Belcher, J. Hall, E. Payson, 

M. Brigida, R. Flagg. 



52 



THE PILGRIM 



Continued from Page 50 
Elizabeth Vaughn, left fullback; and 
Daisy Hall, goalie. 

Our Victories! 

Ply. Opp. 
Oct. 2 Scituate 1 1 away 

10 Hyannis 2 1 here 

17 Marshfield 3 2 away 
23 Kingston 3 here 

25 Bourne 7 away 

28 Tabor 5 2 here 

Nov. 8 Bourne 7 1 here 

14 Marshfield 2 here 
20 Kingston 6 1 away 
30 Alumni 6 here 

More success ! Plymouth's second 
team played three games, winning one, 
tying the other two ! 

And there was a very tangible re- 
ward for this successful season ! 

A banquet was served in Allerton 
Chapel, Church of the Pilgrimage, by 
high school girls under the supervision 
of Miss McNerny. The guests of honor 
were Mrs. Raymond, Miss Brown, and 
Mrs. Garvin. Miss Brown, the toast- 
mistress, introduced the speakers, Mary 
Brigida, Janet Clark, Betty Hall, Lucy 
Mayo, Marjorie Tracy, and Mrs. Gar- 
vin, who spoke briefly on different 
phases of hockey. Later in the evening 
Mrs. Garvin initiated an indoor track 
meet which was fun for everyone. 

The prospects of another good hockey 
team next fall are excellent, and this 
year's team extends its best wishes to 
Mrs. Garvin for another successful 
season next year. 



GET THAT TAP! 

rpHE girls also enjoyed a basketball 
A season which warrants our praise. 
They played eight games and lost but 
one game, the first one, by the narrow 
margin of one basket. The seven vic- 
tories were by large scores. 
Their schedule was: 

Ply. Opp. 
Jan. 15 Middleboro 14 16 here 

29 Bridgewater 37 9 away 
Feb. 5 Rockland 30 9 here 

8 Alumni 42 7 here 

12 E. Bridgewater 42 5 here 
18 Rockland 27 7 away 

21 Bridgewater 27 11 here 
Mar. 12 Middleboro 30 18 away 

The girls who established this fine 
record were: Alba Martinelli, captain; 
Lucy Mayo, Janet Clark, as guards; 
and Betty Hall, Cynthia Drew, Phyllis 
Johnson, and Natalie Caldeira as for- 
wards. 

The second team won the distinction 



of turning every game into a victory 
— and there were seven of them. How- 
ever, they had. to play hard to establish 
their record. These girls were : Evelyn 
Schreiber, captain; Elizabeth Vaughn, 
Margaret Donovan, as guards; Kath- 
erine Christie, Phyllis Lovell, and 
Phyllis Johnson as forwards. 

Janet Clark '36 



GRAND AWARDS 

FOR some years past, girls obtaining 
eight hundred points in sports over a 
period of three years were given a 
grand award. In 1933 three of these 
awards, silver loving cups suitably en- 
graved, were bestowed upon Bertha 
James, Dorothy Testoni, and Leah Al- 
berghini. 

Since that time a candidate has been 
required to earn one thousand points 
in order to receive the cup. In the Class 
of 1933 there is an exceptionally large 
number of girls who have attained this 
goal. At the Commencement Exercises 
five senior girls will be honored : Alice 
Ha 1, Janet Clark, Lucy Mayo, Margaret 
Donovan, and Elizabeth Vaughan. To 
them we extend our congratulations. 



CONFESSIONS OF A G-MAN 

THE town clock was just striking one 
as I boarded the U. S. S. Shipmayi. 
Lang, Lang ... it must be two o'clock. 
But one or two, it didn't bother me. I 
was leaving my birthplace, my native 
land, for a distant isle on which the 
sun Smileys all day. 

I immediately went below and made 
haste to Locklin my cabin and Coombe 
my hair. I was about to retire when 
there was a knock. I went to the door 
Andrea my gun, but no one was there. 
Dirty work below decks ! 

The next day we were shipwrecked on 
Humphreefs. Did that bother me? Not 
in the least. I just made a Rafter and 
Pyled a Bag (nail) of food on it, and 
started for shore. 

Once on terra firma again, I got into 
my WVber's Knight and drove off to 
headquarters. On the way public enemy 
No. 101, a Brown boy, tried to Kelly 
me. I managed to escape, but one of his 
bu'lets must have punctured the tires. 
I got out and Jacques up my car but I 
Kenefichs it. I didn't Carey so I started 
to walk. 

On the way I met a man with a 
Packard. He gave me a ride the rest 
of the way. The secret of my success: 
However far you may Jaunt (son), 
there's no place like home. 



THE PILGRIM 



53 




GIRLS' TRACK TEAM 

First Row: Janet Clark, Alice Hall, Edna Nickerson. 

Second Row: Cynthia Drew, Elizabeth Vaughn, Marion Morey, Phyllis Johnson. 









■ 



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HBO 

VHBHES 



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54 



THE PILGRIM 



ANNUAL SCRAPBOOK 

LET'S take time out to see what some 
1 of the former members of P. H. S. 
are doing. 

Helen Brewer, our former all-round 
athlete, is in Vermont attending Mid- 
dlebury College. 

During the past winter, we envied 
"Babe" James in the sunny south. He 
has been outstanding in basketball dur- 
ing the past year at Florida A. & M. 
College. 

This year finds Warren Strong at 
Annapolis ; and Robert Martin, after at- 
tending M. I. T. for a year, is now at 
West Point. Lucky boys ! Do uniforms 
become them ! 

Out in New York state "Jim" Clark 
is taking life easy at Colgate. "Jim" 
is a member of the Phi Gamma Delta 
fraternity. 

Nearer home, we find Katherine La- 
hey and Albert Albertini conquering 
their difficulties at Bridgewater State 
Teachers' College. 

Lucy Holmes, our capable editor-in- 
chief of '35, is ranking high scholastic- 
ally at Boston University. She won a 
scholarship upon completion of her first 



cation at the Boston University School 
of Music. 

Leroy Schreiber, who attended Moses 
Brown last year, is distinguishing him- 
self at Harvard. 

Howard Corey and August Gomes are 
learning the fine art of farming at the 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 

Harry Burns, enrolled at North- 
western College, recently received a 
scholarship and was also accepted into 
the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. 

Elizabeth Ryan '36 



A TRIBUTE 

TO encourage good citizenship among 
young people, the Massachusetts 
Chapter of the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution sponsored a contest. Its 
purpose was to make people of all ages 
ponder the nature and value of a good 
citizen. The plan was to have each 
school in Massachusetts select a girl 
whom they considered its best citizen. 
When each school had made its choice, 
the names were put into a large box 
and one was selected. This lucky girl 
was to have a free trip to Washington, 
D. C, in April, actually to see how the 

nvPl'nmpnt r,f tha TTnitorl States fuilC- 




THE PILGRIM 



55 



be willing to let someone else accept re- 
sponsibility, that perhaps she already 
has enough to do? No! We just urge 
her to do more for us ; and we get 
results, the best. 

"How can she find time for her stud- 
ies?" we wonder in our more sober 
moments. We confess that we do not 
know, but she does find the time, for, 
in spite of her leadership and service to 
her class and school, she is able to 
maintain excellent grades ; in fact, the 
highest in her class. She is a fine worker 
because she is a willing one. 

She has set an example to be followed 
by every member of Plymouth High 
School. She has a record to be proud of, 
and we are proud of her. We salute 
our best citizen, Alba Martinelli ! 

Lucy Mayo '36 



<.(. 



The Principal's Column 

CREATIVE EFFORT 

WHEN we want a thing, we make 
it — then it's ours." I found this 
statement in the prospectus of a summer 
camp for boys, underneath a photo- 
graph of the boys constructing an out- 
door stage. Later on I discovered that 
many other things which added to the 
equipment, convenience, and beauty of 
the camp had been made by the campers 
themselves. I think this is a most com- 
mendable procedure, for, after all is said 
and done, there is no doubt that the 
planning and creating of something 
tangible and worth producing brings 
abundant satisfaction. In these days 
when so much is done for us, it is, very 
easy to sit back and do nothing for our- 
selves. But such an attitude has its ob- 
vious limitations. There yet remains a 
great deal of creative work to be done 
in the world. Initiative, originality, 
and perseverance still command respect 
and recognition, and bring the finest 
sort of satisfaction to him who pos- 
sesses those virtues. 

Just a few days ago I saw a cartoon 
in a newspaper. It consisted cf two pic- 
tures. The one was that of a pioneer 
prospector, with his crude kit loaded 
on a horse making his way laboriously 
toward some distant mountains. The 
man was represented as saying, "Thar's 
gold in them 'ere hills." The other 
was that of a young man looking toward 
the towering skyscrapers representing 
the business and financial district of a 
great city. The caption was a para- 



phrase of the first inscription and read, 
in effect, "There's opportunity in those 
edifices." Just so. There is opportunity 
both in town and country. The frontiers, 
as such, have disappeared, but pioneers 
are needed in other fields. Omitting, 
for the moment, considerations of the 
materialistic accomplishments of our 
day and generation, I ask you, have we 
reached the ultimate in forming "a 
more perfect union," establishing "jus- 
tice," insuring "domestic tranquility," 
promoting "the general welfare," and 
securing "the blessings of liberty to 
ourselves and our posterity?" Have 
we yet guaranteed "life, liberty, and the 
pursuit of happiness" to all members of 
our democratic society? My* hope is that 
the objectives of not only the founders 
of our government but also of those 
who in every age have envisioned our 
nation as it ought to be, will be ad- 
vanced in no slight degree. Just as 
our new building is being constructed 
brick by brick, and eventually will be 
completed as conceived in the architect's 
mind, — a nearly perfect whole — , just 
so our democratic institutions and social 
structure will, in due time, reach a high 
state of attainment. Do you care 
enough about it to bring it to pass? 

Wayne M. Shipman 






IN MEMORIAM 

The untimely death of Ermes P. 
Manzotti has created among the 
students and alumni of Plymouth 
High School a sense of irreparable 
loss. We admired him for his loy- 
alty to his friends and to his 
school, his steadfastness of pur- 
pose, his determination to succeed. 
We honored him for his musical 
ability of which he gave most 
freely to provide pleasure for 
many. His work in "Daniel 
Boone," "The Pirates of Penzance," 
and "H. M. S. Pinafore" will long 
be remembered by all who heard 
him sing, and the scholarship 
which he received from the New 
England Conservatory of Music 
was a fitting tribute to his talent. 
His passing leaves many of us who 
are proud to say, "He was my 
friend." 



56 



THE PILGRIM 



rt-j 



»««■» .jhhml 




S. A. S. EXECUTIVE BOARD AND COUNCIL 



Brewster, 
R. Lam- 



First Row: A. Dutton, M. Tracey, D. Perkins, L. Mayo, D. Beytes, L. 

J. Whiting, D. Pedersani. 
Second Row: M. Bodell, I. Albertini, B. Paty, V. Baietti, T. Ferioli, 

borghini, M. Fox, A. Martinelli. 
Third Row: A. Hall, M. Brigida, M. Weild, P. Sears, A. Tavernelli, L. 
Fourth Row: F. Scheid, W. Bradford, J. Maccaferri, J. Tavernelli, W. 

R. Sampson, W. Clark. 
Fifth Row: Mr. Shipman, Miss Judd, Mr. Packard, A. Galvani, L. Goodwin, 

S. Brewster, Mrs. Raymond, Miss Brown. 



Roberge. 
Tedeschi, 



THE letters S. A. S. stand for Student 
Activities Society and refer to the 
whole student body of Plymouth High 
School, for every student in school is 
automatically a member of S. A. S. 
According to its constitution, the Soci- 
ety's purpose is to "encourage activities, 
both old and new, in Plymouth High 
School" ; in other words, since the for- 
mation of the Society, student activities 
have been promoted by the students 
themselves instead of being initiated 
by the faculty. Like the citizens of the 
country, the citizens of the school are 
too numerous to govern themselves di- 
rectly and must, of necessity, act 
through their representatives. Your 
Executive Board (initiating projects) 
and your Student Council (voting on 
projects suggested) act and speak for 
you. Do you know them, consult them, 
and give orders to them? You should! 



Since the Society was formed in the 
spring of 1934 its representatives have 
acted upon several important questions 
and promoted some very valuable ac- 
tivities, including the following: 

1. The adoption of a standard school 
ring 

2. The development of cheering at 
basketball games 

3. Attempts at establishing more 
cordial student-faculty social re- 
lations 

4. The compiling of a school hand- 
book 

5. The beginning of a definite pro- 
gram of student participation in 
school assemblies 

6. School cooperation in an annual 
all-school entertainment (the cir- 
cus) 

What does the future hold for S. A. 
S.? It depends on you ! 



THE PILGRIM 



57 




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Prologue: 
Oh, the wailing and the sighing, 
As our pencil we've been plying, . 

In attempting to review the year's 
highlights : 
So excuse our humble trying 
Of our hand at versifying, 

And forgive the awful doggerel it 
writes. 

Student Assemblies: 
First of all for student talent 
(And this year it was most salient,) 
And the very gifted pupils, here's a 
cheer : 
To them all we give our praises, 
Turn with us through memory's pages — 
We'll recall the best assemblies of the 
year. 

Station W. P. H. S. — Your announcer 
is Ralph Lamborghini! 
Twice came that checking-up time, 
That seniors-on-the-spot time 

When you wracked your brain to 
think of what you knew ! 
Know your etiquette and history, 
Your English and biology — 

Or the curious announcer will get 
you! 

A Sidewalk Controversy 
Orchids to Ethel, 

Our Miss Fanny Brice, 
Whose very clever monologues 

Brought laugh-tears to our eyes. 

An Original Composition by Our Sax 
Player 
There was Joe Correa's composing 
And he had us all supposing 

That we had another Gershwin in our 
ranks : 
To Tedeschi's clever playing 
Highest compliments we're paying, 
And to both of them we give our 
hearty thanks. 



Over Station W. P. H. S. 
We had the biggest star show 

Ever heard on radio, 
With Major Bowes and Portland 

And Penner, Pitts, and Garbo. 

Remember? 

But we can't do this sort of thing 
indefinitely, so we revert to prose. 

And now, surely you haven't forgot- 
ten the Christmas assembly presented 
by the Senior French classes. You recall 
that the scene was laid in a Provencal 
church on Christmas eve. Lovely, 
hushed, with the white candle flames 
flickering, the shepherd bringing his 
lamb to be blessed, the carol-singing, 
the peasants who entered with meas- 
ured tread — all were perfect to the last 
detail. 

Micro-Projection : 

Then, there was the day we all went 
"buggy." day of revelation! Seeing 
the little eels in vinegar and the other 
infinitesimal "animals," revealed and 
explained so well by Dr. George Rom- 
mert of Munich, Germany, reminded us 
of the old jingle: 
"Little bugs have smaller bugs 
Upon their backs to bite 'em: 
And these same bugs have other bugs 
And so "ad infinitum." 

Of course, you remember Richard de 
Stephano, of the Junior High School, 
who played the piano so beautifully for 
us. His fingers ran over the keys, and 
we sighed and thought, perhaps — if 
only we had practised! 

The very exclusive Freshman dance 
held in Memorial Hall was, as usual, a 
great success, with the Harmony Twelve 
furnishing the music. 

And you must have enjoyed the cir- 
cus and vaudeville show whether you 
were a performer or a spectator ! 

Do you recall the old-fashioned spell- 
ing bee held by Room 26? "Ipecac" cer- 
tainly proved the sticker! 



58 



THE PILGRIM 



We all enjoyed the amateur show won 
by the inimitable Ethel Shwom. 'Baba, 
do by arithbetic exepple fore be?" Re- 
member? 

As we come to the end of this col- 
umn, we realize that this is the last 
time "under the white cupola," for next 
year we'll be in the new school. And 
that is an experience to which all un- 
derclassmen are looking forward. 

And so, goodbye until next Septem- 
ber. 

Mary Bodell '37 



THE OLD MAN 



HE was an old man who lived by him- 
self on the outskirts of the town in a 
little tumbled-down shack that looked as 
if it would heave a sigh and crumble to 
the ground at the slightest provocation. 
He never ventured out except to buy 
something to eat, and he purchased in 
amounts that would hardly keep a cat 
alive. His long beard and hair were al- 
ways unkempt. He always wore the 
same baggy patched pants and the same 
shabby jacket that was so thin that one 
dared not touch it for fear it would fall 
apart. The same dilapidated hat was 
always pulled down over his eyes. When 
he had paid for his purchases with the 
few coins he kept in his pocket, he would 
shuffle back to his shack and lock him- 
self in. In the evening one could faintly 
discern a dim light sending its feeble 
rays through the broken blinds which 
were always locked tight. The small 
lawn was a carpet of leaves and weeds, 
and an old gnarled oak tree leaned over 
the house as if it were not able to stand 
up alone. A shed behind the shack had 
already crumbled. 

He always went to the village gen- 
eral store twice a week on the same 
days. At night promptly at seven the 
one light would be turned on, no matter 
how dark it was before the specified 
time. He had come to Oakville about 
twenty years ago and nobody knew any 
more about him then than they had when 
he first came. No one knew his name, 
but they all called him the "Old Man." 
Some people had tried to find out about 
him and tried to start a conversation, 
but always he would turn his faded eyes 
on them with a blank expression on his 
face, mutter something unintelligible, 
and shamble away, leaving the person 



staring at him. Many thought him in- 
sane. 

On one of the days that he always 
came to the store, he didn't appear. 
The storekeeper, who thought it was 
queer, kept looking for him. That night 
his curiosity got the better of him and 
so about eight o'clock he and a few 
other townsmen went to the shack. The 
usual light was not burning. The shop- 
keeper was disturbed, thinking the old 
man might be ill. They smashed in the 
door. Cold, musty air met them. The 
shopkeeper shivered and drew his coat 
more closely about him. Someone struck 
a match and, finding the lamp, lit it. The 
room contained only a table on which 
was the lamp, a chair, and a tumble- 
down bed. There on the bed lay the 
old man, dead — dead from the cold and 
hunger. And no one ever knew who he 
was or where he came from. 

Audrey Dutton '37 



ONE WITHERED ROSE 

I found a withered rose 
Press't tight in one old book, 
And I wondered why I chose 
To keep this souvenir. 

A year ago I put it there — 
The year has passed away — 
And now I quite despair 
To discover the reason why. 

Was it a dream, a hate, 
Some pain or hopeless love? 
Or was it guiding Fate 
That made me lay it there? 

The leaves are slowly crumbling, 
No need for mournful sigh, 
The rose is now but dust, 
And the wind tosses it high. 

Alba Martinelli '36 



"Now, be sure and write plain on 
those bottles," said the farmer to the 
druggist, "which is for the horse and 
which is for me. I don't want anything 
to happen to that horse before the 
spring plowing." — Texas Ranger 



Mrs. Bargainhunt (at jeweller's) — 
I just bought this ring at Cut Rate 
Joe's, across the street. How do you 
pronounce the name of the stone? Is 
it turkoise or turkwoise? 

Jeweller (after inspecting stone) — 
The correct pronunciation, madam, is 
"glass." — Michigan Christian Advocate 



THE PILGRIM 



59 




Mr. U. R. A. Reader 
U. S. A. 
Dear Sir: 

Aware of the fact that you are in 
search of the best of school magazines, 
we send an analysis of some of these. 

The Wampatuck, Braintree, we find, 
is very well-arranged, and full of in- 
teresting cuts. Here is an excerpt il-' 
lustrating its humor : 

"A milliner endeavored to sell to a 
colored woman one of the last season's 
hats at a very moderate price. It was 
a large, white picture hat. 

"Law, no, honey!" exclaimed the 
woman. "I could nevah weah that. I'd 
look jes' like a blueberry in a pan of 
milk!" 

Another of our friends is the Gazette 
of Lynn. The first thing that we par- 
ticularly noticed (we always begin at 
the middle) was an idiosyncracy ap- 
propriately called the Gasjette. The 
humor literally flooded us. 

Next is the Red Cap of North At- 
tleboro which includes a most original 
feature, "The Gospel Truth." How- 
ever, this little paper lacks a variety of 
poetry and fiction. 

The Scoop, a newsy little paper from 
Wareham, is next on our list. The 
Snooper, we noticed, is right on his job. 



The colorful cover design of the 
Sachem of Middleboro drew us like a 
bee to honey. The only fault that we 
could find was a decided lack of illus- 
trative material. 

The Blue Oivl, published by the stud- 
ents of the Attleboro High School, is 
stuffed full of interesting stories. When 
better stories are written, Blue Owl will 
write them. 

This time it is the Stetson Oracle of 
Randolph. And again we were con- 
fronted with something new; namely, 
"Without a Pencil." It is composed of 
"brain teasers" which serve their pur- 
pose much too well. 

In the Abhis of Abington, we par- 
ticularly noticed two features written 
in play form: "Abhis Episodes" and 
"An Intellectual Debate." However, 
we could find no jokes. 

The Clipper of Barnstable is next on 
our list. This is a newcomer, although 
it seemed like a veteran to us. Its car- 
toonist surely owns a clever pencil. 

Last of all, we submit the Eastoner of 
the Oliver Ames High School. Its joke 
page is full of original wit. Our eye 
was also attracted by a feature, "The 
Job of an Editor." 

Respectfully yours, 

Exchange Editors 



JOKES 



Pedestrian (to boy leading a skinny 
mongrel pup) — What kind of a dog is 
that, my boy? 

Boy — This is a police dog. 

Pedestrian — That doesn't look like a 
police dog. 

Boy — Nope, it's in the secret service. 
— Tips and Topics 



Misunderstood 

Lady (in crowd) : Stop pushing, 
can't you? 

Stout Man: I'm not pushing; I only 
sighed. — Movie News 



Fatal 



Once a Scotchman didn't go to a ban- 
quet because he didn't know what the 
word gratis on the invitation meant. 
The next day he was found dead before 
an open dictionary. — Open Road 



"Dear Doctor: My pet billy-goat is 
seriously ill from eating a complete 
leather-bound set of Shakespeare. What 
do you prescribe?" 

Answer: "Am sending the Literary 
Digest by return mail." 



60 



THE PILGRIM 



Name 


Nickname 


Evelyn Arruda 


Evy 


Geraldine Balboni 


Jedda 


Alice Banzi 


Al 


Marion Beauregard 


Ducky 


Elizabeth Belcher 


Lizzie 


Betty Boudrot 


Bet 


Constance Caldera 


Connie 


Natalie Caldera 


Kid Cal 


Jesse Callahan 


Kelly 


Marjorie Ceccarelli 


Checker 


Katherine Christie 


Kay 


Janet Clark 


Lefty 


Sarah Clark 


Blimp 


Mary Crescenza 


Spiffy 


Marjorie Croft 


Marjie 


Sarah Crowell 


Red 


Margaret Donovan 


Margy 


Eleanor Drew 


Bunny 


Florence Drew 


Dudie 


Arlene Dries 


Goo-goo 


Dorothy Dunbar 


Dot 


Thelma Ferioli 


Thel 


Margaret Fox 


Margy 


Louisa Gallerani 


Tiny 


Betty Gardner 


Bet 


Thelma Garuti 


Thel 


Alma Gilli 


Al 


Mary Goddard 


May 


Dorothy Govoni 


Dottie 


Alice Hall 


Betty 


Daisy Hall 


Dizzy 


Martha Hall 


Toot 


Dorothy Hamblin 


Dot 


Rosamond Harlow 


Rossie 


Frances Harty 


Fritz 


Marion Henderson 


Honey 


Ruth Huntley 


P'mp 


Henriette Huriaux 


Harriet 


Wilma Hurle 


Willie 


Louise Ide 


Micky 


Hilda Jesse 


Peaches 


Mildred Lapham 


Mini 


Addie Leland 


Ad 


Ella Lemius 


Ellie 


Althea Lewis 


Duchess 


Barbara MacDonald 


Barb 


Alba Martinelli 


Skippy 


Lucy Mayo 


Lou 


Jennie Mazzilli 


Jen 


Helene Michel 


Micky 


Priscilla McCosh 


Prissie 


Marian Morey 


Irish 


Elsie Monti 


Frenchy 


Barbara Neal 


Barb 


Edna Nickerson 


Nicky 


Cynthia Oldham 


Cyn 


Doris Pederzani 


Chee-nin-a 


Dorothy Perkins 


Dot 


Viola Petit 


Vi 


Ethel Pimental 


Chicky 


Arlene Raymond c - 


Butterene 


Ruth Raymond ..■-■/ 


Ruthie 


Eva Reggiani 


"- Jerry 


Elsie Rezendes 


"■ r El 


Priscilla Roberts 


■ Silly 


Dorothy Rogers 


..Dot 


Gertrude Russell 


Gert 


Elizabeth Ryan 


Dib 


Ellen Sampson 


Sticky 


Katherine T. Sampson 


Kay 


Kathryn V. Sampson 


Kay 


Elinor Sanderson 


Elly ■ - 


Evelyn Schreiber 


Pevelyn ■ . 



Ambition 

To have a "sugar daddy" 

To know her history 

To grow up 

To reduce 50 pounds more or less 

To find the guy who wrote this nickname 

To aid people 

To find something to laugh at 

To have friends to treat 

To meet Clark Gable 

To be remembered 

To live in Duxbury 

To be a fixer-upper 

To tell people about her "old home town" 

To keep busy 

To lead a band 

To wear a uniform 

To complain about something 

To get physically fit and stay that way 

To be a farm maid 

To dance with Fred Astaire 

To be as tall as Pauline 

To dance with Deane and Carlo at the same time 

To become famous 

To be a nut 

To own a red car in partnership 

To shovel snow in June 

To control her stubborness 

To be successful 

To be a second Daddy-long-legs 

To give a good speech 

To make everyone's hair curl 

To talk once in class and not get caught 

To keep fooling 

To be a debutante 

To travel 

To meet the German Band 

To meet that fellow — 8 ft. 4V 2 in. 

To have a secretary to read for her in class 

To lead an orchestra 

To sell cough drops 

To have an amplifier to talk through 

To be a good screamer 

To be heard 

To be the President's secretary 

To be a queen 

To be a dietitian 

To be or not to be 

To be around in 1955 

To ride on a fire engine 

To go to Germany 

To join Major Bowes' Amateurs 

To be a champion broad-jumper 

To own a yarn shop 

To live in a brick house 

To make up her mind 

To own a cutwork shop 

To be everyone's friend 

To have naturally curly hair 

To learn to say "Hi" 

To be a model 

To go to Harvard 

To be a success at graduation 

To be a fan dancer 

To fool some of the people with her tricks 

To be a nightingale 

To extract teeth 

To go skunk hunting 

To talk in town meeting ... 

To wiggle her ears 

To be a friend 

To shut doors quietly 

To own a banjo factory 

To keep those curls 



THE PILGRIM 



61 



Name 


Nickname 


Rose Sherman 


Red 


Gertrude Simmons 


Gert 


Evelyn Strassel 


Evvie 


Mildred Strassel 


Milly 


Ruth Valler 


Babe 


Dorothy Vandini 


Dot 


Elizabeth Vaughn 


Betty 


Pauline Viau 


Paul 


Jean Whiting 


Butch 


Gertrude Wood 


Gert 


Virginia Wood 


Jinny 


Mildred Wright 


Milly 


Amy Young 


Fritz 


Douglass Armstrong 


Doug 


William Bagnell 


Bill 


Vincent Baietti 


Jelly 


Alexander Barbieri 


Alec 


Charles Barengo 


Charlie 


Deane Beytes 


Bean Deany 


Warren Bradford 


Braddy 


Edward Brewster 


Eddie 


George Campbell 


Bamp 


Antonio Carvalho 


Cartso 


Philip Chandler 


Tarzan 


Prentiss Childs 


Childs 


Ward Clarke 


Red 


George Courtney 


Skunk 


Frederick Deacon 


Deac 


James Devitt 


Jimmy 


Robert Dunham 


Bob 


Charles Fraser 


Charlie 


James Frazier 


Jimmy 


Ellis Gilman 


Gilly 


Lawrence Goodwin 


Brud 


Gildo Govoni 


Geldo 


Robert Hall 


Bobby 


Richard Harlow 


Ruffneck 


Donald Hughes 


Donnie 


John Kuhn 


Cappy 


Ralph Lamborghini 


Busty 


Curtis Lowe 


Shine 


Oliver Matinzi 


Mat 


Webster Moores 


Melrose 


Frank Neal 


Red 


Edgar Nickerson 


Nick 


George Nickerson 


Nick 


Alexander Pearson 


Alec 


Donald Peterson 


Donnie 


Peter Peterson 


Pete 


Francis Phillips 


Brud 


Francis Poirier 


Frannie 


Louis Poluzzi 


Luigi 


Robert Proffetty 


Profet 


Harold Raymond 


Hully 


Joseph Ryan 


Joe 


Romeo Santerre 


Pro 


George Scagliarini 


Georgie 


Peter Secondo 


Pete 


Jacob Shwom 


Jake 


Frank Silvia 


Frankie 


Antone Spalluzzi 


Spaget 


Alvin Tavares 


Al 


Anthony Tavernelli 


Tony 


Daniel Tribou 


Danny 


Douglas Tubbs 


Doug 


Robert Volk 


Sonny 


Albert Walton 


Al 


Alton Whiting 


Cap 


Frederick Wood 


Fred 


George Wood 


Woody 


Burnham Young 


Bunny 


Eli Zavalcofsky 


Zav 



Ambition 

To be the cop on the corner 

To have a new beach wagon to drive 

To be a guest at a filling station 

To be natural 

To be a hostess at a lunch counter 

To be somebody's honey 

To prove her point 

To be Clark Gable's secretary 

To know all the answers 

To get married 

To own a Handkerchief Shoppe 

To shine doorknobs 

To get notes for the rest of her life 

To be head messenger 

To forget he was an elephant 

To own a bank for his dimes 

To be everyone's milkman 

To be a gentleman (farmer?) with a future 

To be a slave to women 

To finish making his car 

To be a one-man brain trust 

To be a villain 

To take things easy 

To learn to drive 

To be a Manomet Hill-Billy 

To go back to the farm 

To stay out of hospitals 

To have an ambition 

To make more money 

To be Bigger and Better 

To overcome his bashfulness (open to suggestion) 

To be an A-l Skipper-of -classes 

To be a good ride-thumber 

To be a hermit 

To know when the teacher's looking 

To own his own car 

To wake up early 

To be in circulation or Mr. X 

To be without that guy, Hully 

To own a soap box 

To have a private shoe shine boy 

To be a truant officer, heh, heh! 

To manufacture red sweaters 

To go to West Point 

To be in all the hockey games 

To be a parachute jumper 

To be a speedy paper boy 

To find a girl 

To get out of high school 

To help Braddy finish the car 

To be a cooking teacher 

To go to Holland 

To do something surprising 

To learn to dance (assistance needed) 

To tour Ethiopia on a bicycle 

To be a good cook 

To play for the Red Sox 

To be a good wisecracker 

To find a good listener 

To be mayor of Chiltonville 

To be another Rip Van Winkle 

To go with Louis 

To be with a nurse 

To get his English done on time 

To know this power he has over women 

To be a menace to society 

To be a graduate 

To run a dancing school 

TO live in Plymouth 

To be a lumberjack 

To be a marathon runner 

To be the head of all Western Union Stations 



62 



THE PILGRIM 




FACULTY 

First Row: Mr. Shipman, Miss Carey, Miss Rafter, Miss Coombes, Miss Jacques, 
Miss Johnson, Miss Wilbur, Mr. Mongan. 

Second Row: Miss Locklin, Miss McNerney, Miss Brown, Miss Judd, Mrs. Ray- 
mond, Miss Humphrey, Miss Lang. 

Third Row: Miss Andrews, Miss Johnson, Miss Kenenck. 

Fourth Row: Mr. Ingraham, Mr. Pyle, Mr. Smiley, Mr. Bagnall, Mr. Packard, 
Mr. Romano. 



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HONOR SOCIETY 
Firsi flow;: Miss Carey, A. Dutton, E. Belcher, V. Baietti, J. Whiting, D. Beytes, 

D. Perkins, E. Ryan, P. McCosh, D. Pederzani. 
Second Row: M. Bodell, A. Martinelli, M. Weild, L. Mayo, K. Christie, P. 

Roberts, M. Fox. 
Third Row: M. Brigida, J. Clark, A. Paoli. 
Fourth Row: E. Vaughn, LeB. Briggs, L. Goodwin, J. Ryan, L. Brewster, T. 

Feriola, P. Viau. 



THE PILGRIM 



63 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

IN these past few uncertain years, the 
question of choosing the institution of 
higher learning which shall best enable 
the student to continue those lines of 
study in which, during his high school 
career, he has displayed most aptitude, 
has, more than ever before, become a 
question of very great moment. With 
the changing of conditions, students 
have been forced to consider practical 
conditions as well as higher education 
in its more cultural aspects. 

For those of you who feel that vour 
natural endowments peculiarly fit you to 
train yourselves in any one of the 
myriad branches of music, it is a neces- 
sity that you should enroll in a musical 
institution of proved standing — in the 
front ranks of which must be numbered 
the New England Conservatory of 
Music. In tune with the times, the 
student will find himself advised to 
deve'op his musical ability with today's 
two goals always in mind — music as an 
art, and music as a profession. 

It cannot be denied that in the past 
decade the young musician's prospects 
have brightened. While, as always, 
those who achieve fame as great per- 
formers remain a handful, the amazing 
growth of music in schools has opened 
many new ways for teachers, and has 
caused the New England Conservatory 
to enlarge its School Music Department. 
Marked increase of public interest in 
better music has placed young musicians 
in positions in which possibilities of 
success are greater. 

In addition to a complete curriculum 
of subiects both in applied and the- 
oretical music (arranged in courses 
leading to diploma or degrees) the New- 
England Conservatory of Music — by 
reason of a large and able faculty, and 
the extensive scope of its facilities — 
is able to offer students practical ex- 
perience they would be able to obtain 
in but few other institutions. The Con- 
servatory Orchestra, numbering eighty- 
five players, affords training in orches- 
tral routine and literature ; weekly 
student recitals afford young perform- 



ers invaluable experience in performing 
before audiences; and the recent inau- 
guration of weekly broadcasts has fre- 
quently enlisted the services of advanced 
student performers. An exceptionally 
active Dramatic Department, and a di- 
vision of academic studies, supplement 
the Conservatory's musical resources. 
Many students, attending other schools 
in Boston, often continue musical work 
with private lessons at the Conserva- 
tory — either as a cultural avocation or 
with an eye to its future importance in 
their lives. 

Today, modern educators are agreed 
that as a contribution to happy, enjoy- 
able, creative living, nothing can quite 
take the place of music. 



L. M. — I hear that they are printing 
a lot of junk in The Pilgrim this year? 

Dumb — Yah ! Your picture appears 
on at least six different pages. 



Small Boy — What is college bred? 

Pop (with a son at college) — They 
make college bread, my boy, from the 
flour of youth and the dough of old age. 
— West Pointer 



First Stranger (at the party) — Very 
dull, isn't it? 

Second — Yes, very. 
First — Let's go home. 
Second — I can't, I'm the host. 



"Bredren," said the colored preacher, 
"you have come to pray for rain. 
Bredren, de foundation of religion am 
faith. Whar is yoah faith? You comes 
to pray foh rain and not one of yo' 
brings his umbrella." 



Dolly was just home after her first 
day at school. "Well, darling," asked 
her mother, "what did they teach you ?" 

"Not much," replied the child. I've 
got to go again." — Montreal Star 



The editors wish to express 
their indebtedness to the Senior 
Typewriting Class for typing the 
copy for this issue of THE Pilgrim. 



64 THE PILGRIM 



Your Design for Living 

should include the development and training 
of your talent in Music as 

A SATISFYING, CREATIVE PROFESSION, OR 
A CULTURAL, STIMULATING AVOCATION 

Beginning Its 70th Year September 17, 1936 

Conservatory 

Director III" Rfflll^tll Dean o/ Faculty 

Wallace Goodrich \JM l~ M.\J **Jm\* Frederick S. Converse 

Offers you: General or Specialized training in all de- 
partments of music in one of the country's oldest musical 
institutions . . . Courses leading to Degrees or Diploma 
— either as a performer, teacher, in public school music, 
or as a Bachelor or Master of Music . . . Private 
instruction in applied music or theoretical subjects 
Evening school courses throughout the year . . . 
Summer School. 

Practical training . . . weekly student recitals afford 
valuable experience to soloists ... a symphony 
orchestra of eighty-five players . . . weekly radio 
broadcasts by faculty members and advanced students 
. . . Band and Chorus of student performers . . . 
Dramatic Department, with full season of presentations 
. . . Dancing. 

FOR DETAILED, ILLUSTRATED CATALOG and APPLICATIONS 

Write to 

FREDERICK S. CONVERSE, Dean 

New England Conservatory of Music 

HUNTINGTON AVENUE BOSTON, MASS. 



THE PILGRIM 



65 



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66 



THE PILGRIM 



GIVE A THOUGHT TO THE FUTURE 

TTAVE you thought of the time when you will be ready to take your 
place in the world of industry? Have you picked the career you 
wish to follow? 



Why not, then, follow the example of 
many other New England girls .... 
choose Beauty Culture, the profession 
that insures success .... that means 
good positions — a professional career 
and a pleasing vocation. 
The Wilfred Academy of Hair and 
Beauty Culture, is an ethical school 
manned by a faculty of world famous 
authorities in all branches of hair de- 
sign and beauty culture. It thoroughly 
trains you to become an accredited 



professional. 

A Wilfred diploma enjoys unequaled 
prestige with beauty experts every- 
where. It entitles you to respect and 
honor and it is a guarantee that you 
are well versed in all the fundamen- 
tals of this fascinating field. 
Call, write or phone for illustrated 
booklet "24E" — Day and evening classes. 
Register now, so that you may be sure 
of a place in our classes the day after 
your school term is over. 



WILFRED ACADEMY 

OF BEAUTY CULTURE 

492 Boylston St., Boston Mass. KENmore 7286 

ALSO NEW YORK, BROOKLYN, PHILADELPHIA, NEWARK 



GRADUATION 



SENIORS 



You'll want to look your best when you step up to receive your diploma, 
at that great event — Graduation 

WE HAVE THE SUITS, TIES, SHIRTS, AND SHOES THAT WILL GIVE YOU THE 

WELL-DRESSED APPEARANCE THAT YOU DESIRE. VISIT OUR STORE 

AND LET US ASSIST YOU IN MAKING YOUR SELECTIONS. 

PURITAN CLOTHING COMPANY 



"Plymouth's Largest Store for Men arid Boys" 



56 MAIN STREET 



Tel. 1121 



PLYMOUTH 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 



Your Hardware Store For 111 Years 



Paints, Household Appliances, 

Plumbing, Heating and Sheet Metal Work 

Tel. 283 PLYMOUTH 



THE PILGRIM 



67 













*s»iiiy^ 



Compliments of 



CAPPANNARI BROS. 



STEVENS THE FLORIST 



FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



9 COURT STREET 



Member of The Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 



68 



THE PILGRIM 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 
S. S. Pierce Specialties 
Birdseye Frosted Foods 

1 Warren Ave. Tel. 1298-W 


BERNARD LORING 

and His 

ORCHESTRA 
The Unit for Your School Dances 


Compliments of 

DR. WM. E. CURTIN 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


ZANELLO FURNITURE CO, 

Bedding -- Furniture -- Upholstering 

84 COURT ST. Tel. 1485 PLYMOUTH 


PLYMOUTH BAKING CO. 

BREAD, PIES, and CAKES 

Wholesale and Retail 

20 Market St. Tel. 225-M Plymouth 


Compliments of 

THE LINCOLN ST. and PRINCE ST. 

TEXACO STATIONS 

Primo Zucchelli 


Compliments of 

CEASAR'S 


Compliments of 

SCHWOM BROS. 


Compliments of 

RICHARD'S SHOE REBUILDER 


IT HAS BEEN OUR GREAT PLEASURE TO SERVE 

BOTH THE HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 
DURING THE SCHOOL YEARS FROM 1929 TO 1936 

LAHEY'S 

High Quality Ice Cream 



THE PILGRIM 



69 



Compliments of 



MITCHELL - THOMAS CO., INC. 

Plymouth's Leading Furniture Store 



OPPOSITE PILGRIM HALL 



EXPERT WORKMANSHIP 

Careful and Thorough Work Done 
For You In 

CENTRAL SHOE REPAIR 

37 Main Street 



"AMERICA'S GREAT SHOE-VALUE" 



W. L. DOUGLAS SHOE CO. 



WILLIAM W. HARLOW, Manager 



47 Main Street Plymouth, Mass. 



BORZAN BEAUTY SALON 

Permanents $2.98 

End Permanents $1.98 

Hair Cuts, Finger Waves, Manicure, Eyebrows and Hair Trimming 

Priced at 25c 

MISSES BORSARI AND ZANDI 



20 North Spooner Street 



NORTH PLYMOUTH 



Call Miss Zandi 



ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Transparent Water Colors India Ink, black and colors 

Brushes and Water Colors 

Oil and Water Colors Sketching Books Drawing Papers 

A. S. BURBANK 

Pilgrim Book and Art Shop 



70 THE PILGRIM 



BAILEY MOTOR SALES, INC. 

114 Sandwich Street PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Tel. 1090 

Buick and Pontiac Sales and Service 
G.M.C. Truck Sales and Service 

A reliable place to trade 

One of the best equipped Service Stations in this vicinity 

24-hour servce: open day and night 

Agents for Exide Batteries and General Tires 

Don't forget — all of our repair work is guaranteed 

A fine selection of Used Cars and Trucks to choose from at all times 



Compliments of 



BUTTNER'S 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



THE PILGRIM 



71 



DELIVERY and SERVICE 

at 

PRISCILLA CLEANERS 

Repairing -- Pressing 
Dyeing 

Main Street Plymouth 

Tel. 803-M 

JIM'S LUNCH and 
RESTAURANT 

Regular Dinners — A la Carte Service 

Shore Dinners Our Specialty 



5 and 7 Main St. 



Plymouth 



Tel. 1157-W 



LEONORE'S BEAUTY SALON 

Eugene Permanent Waving 

Latest Methods of 
Beauty Culture 

Tel. 1116-W 



40 Main St. 



Plymouth 



Compliments of 



CHARLES MONING 



Class of '84 



Cuisine Unexcelled 
Prices Moderate 



A 



O 



fr 



rC\\^ Phone 430 



45 Court Street 



Plymouth 



BENJAMIN D. LORING 

Diamonds, Watches, 

Jewelry, Silverware 

CLOCKS 

Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty — All Work Done 

In Our Own Shop 
28 Main Street PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



J & S AUTO SERVICE, INC. 

Repairs -- Gas -- Oil -- Servicing 

TIRES and ACCESSORIES 

111 Sandwich St. Plymouth 

Phone 821 



PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

WM. CAVICCHI, Prop. 

Quality Merchandise at Lowest Prices 
18 Main Street Tel. 341 

PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 
STREET RAILWAY CO. 

"Get a Crowd Together and Go as a 
Group — It's More Fun and Cheaper" 

Sandwich St., Plymouth 



72 



THE PILGRIM 



Relief for Acid Stomach 

BISMA - REX 

Four Action Antacid Powder 

Neutralizes Acidity--Removes Gas—Soothes 
Stomach- -Assists Digestion 

Big Bottle 50c 

SAVE with SAFETY at 

COOPER DRUG COMPANY 
BEMIS DRUG COMPANY 

"The 6 Busy REXALL Stores" 

ABINGTON -NO. ABINGTON --ROCKLAND 

"In Plymouth it's Cooper's" 


Lovering Radio Service 

Sales Service 

PHILCO 

For Your Home Or Car 
4 Emond Bldg. Tel. 918 Plymouth 


Compliments of 

GAMBINPS 


ENNA JETTICK SHOES FOR LADIES 
TOMBOY SHOES FOR CHILDREN 

EDDIE'S SHOE SYSTEM 

18 Main St. EDWARD HAND, Mgr. 


Compliments of 

EARL W. GOODING 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 


WM. J. BERG 

MEN'S SHOP 

Clothing and Furnishings 

42 Court St. Plymouth 


Compliments of 

DR. THOMAS W. LOFT 
Class of 1916 


COUNTY AUTO SUPPLY, INC. 

GAS, OIL and ACCESSORIES 
Main St. Ext. Plymouth 


Compliments of 

WILLIAM F. GOODWIN 

POSTMASTER 


Compliments of 

DR. A. L. DOUGLAS 


THE LARGEST FURNITURE ESTABLISHMENT IN SOUTHEASTERN MASS. 

Sherman's Hardware and Furniture Co. 

2 BIG STORES 

50 Court St., Plymouth 310 Court St., No. Plymouth 



THE PILGRIM 



73 



WHEN THERE IS BETTER WORK DONE 
WE WILL DO IT 

JOHN H. GOVI 

TAILOR 

Main Street Plymouth 


WOOD'S FISH MARKET 

The Ocean's Best 
Main St. Extension Phone 261 


Compliments of 

W. L. MERRILL, M.D. 


Compliments of 

DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 

OPTOMETRIST 
Russell BIdg. Plymouth 


ALLERTON 
GREENHOUSES 

ROSE SCHLECHT, Prop. 
STORE GREENHOUSES 

10 Court St. 24 '/ 2 Allerton St. 


Compliments of 

THOMAS F. RYAN 

DRUGS 


BANDER'S WOMEN'S SHOP 

Misses' and Women's Apparel 
at Popular Prices 

54 Main St. Plymouth 


Compliments of 

CLOUGH'S MARKET 

84 Summer Street Plymouth 


Compliments of 

DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN 


Compliments of 

GRAY THE CLEANER 


C. PAUL 

For Your Shoes and Repairing 

Honest Values and Dependable Service 

52 Court St. Plymouth 


Compliments of 

J. F. TAYLOR 

DENTIST 


AMOCO GAS 

GREASE -- OIL - ACCESSORIES 

E. C. Dunham, Mgr. 

Main St. Ext. Plymouth 



74 



THE PILGRIM 



Burdett Business Training 



Courses for Young Men: Business Administration and Accounting, as 
preparation for sales, credit, financial, office management and 
accounting positions. College grade instruction. 

Open to High School Graduate' 

Courses for Young Women: Executive Secretarial, Stenographic Secretarial, 
also Finishing Courses, as preparation for promising secretarial 
positions. Individual advancement. 

Open to High School Graduates 

Courses for Young Men and Young Women: General Business, Book- 
keeping, Shorthand and Typewriting, as preparation for general 
business and office positions. 

Open to High School Graduates 



Previous commercial 
training not required 
for entrance. Many 
leading colleges repre- 
sented in attendance. 



Send for 
Illustrated Catalog 



, n nr « v » * w 




Burdett College 



BURDETT 



President 



156 STUART STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
TELEPHONE HANCOCK 6300 



I 




Why JL should j>ut 

savings into 
CO-OPERATIVE BANK 

shares NOW . . . 



1. I know my money will be safe regard- 
less of business conditions. 2. I can get 
it when I want it. 3. This is the quickest way to reach my 
goal, whether I save for next summer's vacation, for a honey- 
moon-home, or for future security. 4. This is the easier, 
simpler, more convenient way to get the extra money I'll 
need to buy, build, modernize or re-finance a home. 

PLYMOUTH CO-OPERATIVE BANK 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

44 Main Street Telephone 236 

Member of Federal Home Loan Bank 



THE PILGRIM 



75 



For Graduation Gifts Give A Fine 
Watch or Ring 

We carry a complete line of nationally advertised Watches: 
Elgin, Hamilton, Bulova, Gruen, Waltham. Pay as little as 
50c a week. No interest or carrying charges. The credit 
price is never higher than the cash price. 




\ 



~M<mir 



EWELRY 

/ / I 




COMPANY 



Visit Our 

MODERN 

OPTICAL 

DEPARTMENT 

DR. E. P. JEWETT 

Registered Optometrist 
In Charge 



Compliments of 

OLD COLONY LAUNDRY 
OF PLYMOUTH 



CURRIER'S 
ICE CREAM 

Kemp's Candies and Nuts 

Luncheon and Home Made Pastries 



63 Main Street 



Plymouth 



STYLE Plus QUALITY 

Two Very Important Words in Our New Line of Sport Clothes for Summer 

WASH SLACKS -- SPORT SHIRTS - SWEATERS -- NOVELTY HOSE 

In Our New Style Line You Will Find Something Different 
Agents for BOSTONIAN SHOES 

MORSE & SHERMAN 



Court Street 



WM. J. SHARKEY 



Plymouth 



76 



THE PILGRIM 




One of Our Customers ? ? ? 

SHE IS YOUNG, ALERT, INTELLIGENT — 
SHE KNOWS WHAT SHE WANTS AND WE 
ENDEAVOR TO SERVE HER NEEDS. 

SHE IS MODERN AND EFFICIENT AND WILL 
NOT TOLERATE INCONVENIENT, MUSSY 
AND OUTMODED MEANS OF LIVING. 

Plymouth County Electric Co, 



Plymouth Gas Light Co. 



THE PILGRIM 



77 



WHITE HORSE PLAYLAND 

Shuffle Board 
Dancing 

"KELLER'S" 



TUTORING 

Members of P. H. S. faculty remain- 
ing in Plymouth for the summer are 
prepared to tutor in many high school 
subjects. 

Call Mr. Wayne M. Shipman, Princi- 
pal, for further information. 



BOWL AND BE HAPPY 

at 

WHITE HORSE BEACH ALLEYS 

Bowling Daily 
Sundays 1 to 11 P. M. 

For Reservations Call Manomet 22 J. D. WYNER 



Make your next automobile investment the 
soundest money can buy 



A NEW 



FORD V-8 



Pay for it through the 
UNIVERSAL CREDIT COMPANY 

at the rate of 




MONTH 

(after usual, low down payment . . . your PRESENT car will 
probably cover that) 

We are offering this finance plan, as well as other plans figured at the rate 

of Vz of l'/< (6% for 12 months) on the original unpaid 

balance and insurance. 

Get complete details and a ride in a New Ford V*8 by calling 

Plymouth Motor Sales 



Authorized Ford Sales and Service 
181 COURT ST. Tel. 1247-W 



PLYMOUTH 



78 



THE PILGRIM 



Northeastern 
University 




Day Division 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the under- 
standing of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. The 
purpose of this program is to give the student a liberal and cultural education and 
a vocational competence which fits him to enter some specific type of useful 
employment. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles 
of business with specialization in ACCOUNTING, BANKING AND FINANCE, or 
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. Instruction is through modern methods including 
lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, professional talks by 
business executives, and motion pictures of manufacturing processes. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional courses in 
the fields of CIVIL, MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL. CHEMICAL, INDUSTRIAL 
ENGINEERING, and ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION. General engineering 
courses are pursued during the Freshman year; thus the student need not make a 
final decision as to the branch of Engineering in which he wishes to specialize 
until the beginning of the Sophomore year. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to the students in all courses, provides 
for a combination of practical industrial experience with classroom instruction. 
Under this plan the student is able to earn a portion of his school expenses as well 
as to form business contacts which prove valuable in later years. 



Degrees Awarded 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Science 



For catalog' or further information write to: 

northeastern university 

MILTON J. SCHLAGENHAUF, Director of Admissions 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



THE PILGRIM 79 



Graduates of PLYMOUTH HIGH — 



"V7"0UR four years of High School are over. Yet your lives 
are only beginning and the knowledge which can be yours 
is only limited by yourself. 

The well informed person keeps in touch with national, state 
and local affairs. His source of information comes from 
recognized newspapers. Local affairs may be followed accu- 
rately through the columns of the Old Colony Memorial — 
recognized and acknowledged to be "New England's Finest 
Weekly Newspaper." Establish the habit now of reading your 
Plymouth Newspaper every week. 



PRINTING? 



1%/TORE and more individuals, business establishments and 
manufacturers are turning to The Memorial Press of 
Plymouth for the production of their printing requirements. 
The Memorial Press is the largest printing plant in South- 
eastern Massachusetts and fully equipped in every particular 
for the rapid and economical production of printing orders. 



THE MEMORIAL PRESS 

MIDDLE STREET, LLyMCLTL, MASS. 

Boston Office: Plymouth 

40 CENTRAL ST. Tel.: 77 

Tel.: Cap. 5490